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Blog: It’s ‘all change’ at Chertsey Road


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Chertsey Road, our residential service in Richmond, is undergoing a makeover; we are currently in the process of building a new four bedroom bungalow on the grounds. It is being designed around the needs of the four ladies currently living at Chertsey Road as the current building is not going to be able to meet their longer-term needs. The new build will enable the ladies to continue living in a safe environment and lead independent lives with the support from the Chertsey Road team. They will also have the opportunity to personalise the bungalow and be involved in decorating and choosing colours/furniture for their new bedrooms as part of the building process.

Once the bungalow has been completed, the main house at Chertsey will then be redeveloped into a supported living service, which will allow us to offer further support to individuals who wish to lead independent lives.

Check back here for future updates and pictures as the project progresses;

Latest news as of 7th June; Exciting news! Brickwork has now begun on the site.

Latest news as of 15th May; Day 1 of the project; cleaning and preparations for the site begin with the foundations going in. Please click through the pictures above to view the progress of the project.

Chertsey Road


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Chertsey is a registered residential home for five female adults with Learning Disabilities and individual complex needs in Twickenham.

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Sunflower growing races gets Regard’s services ready for summer


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Our services are embracing the start of summer with a new competition: ‘Bloom and Win’.

Every service has been given a packet of sunflower seeds and their teams are racing to see who can grow the tallest ones. Later in the summer we are holding a competition across Regard to win a prize for the best photograph – we’ve already seen evidence of many green fingers with sunflowers reaching a metre high in a very short time.

At our OWL service, Town Farm Workshop in Dorset the people we support have really got into the groove – making colourful paper sunflowers and wonderful art – look out Van Gogh!

Watch this space to see giant sunflowers coming soon.

OWL Town Farm Workshop


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

YoungMinds have been voted as our charity of the year


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We’ve had a great year holding many fundraising events to help raise money for our 2016/17 charity MIND. We raised a total of £3500 with The Regard Group matching this to make a grand total of £7000.

Many of our services, staff and the people we support got into the spirit by holding fundraising events throughout the year which included; mud races, coffee/cake mornings, BBQs, a Rock ‘n’ Roll themed party, sponsored bike rides, Scrabble competitions and much more (you can read more about these events by visiting www.regard.co.uk/success-stories).

This year, YoungMinds, the UK’s leading charity committed to supporting children and young adults have been voted as our charity of the year for 2017/18.

Money raised throughout the year will go towards funding YoungMinds vital work to help improve the wellbeing and mental health of children and young people.

Over 2,000 of our staff were given the opportunity to vote for our charity this year with YoungMinds coming out on top.

We look forward to another year full of fun events to help raise money for this amazing charity and the work they do. To find out more about YoungMinds you can visit their website; www.youngminds.org.uk

Care Home Open Day 2017


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Following on from the success of last year’s event some of our services are opening up their doors, once again, for national Care Home Open Day 2017.

Care Home Open Day’s emphasis is on the importance of connecting with local communities to develop lasting relationships. We value the relationships we have with the communities near to our services very highly and would welcome the opportunity to show you around and introduce you to some of the wonderful people that we support.

Please see the list of services holding events, if you would like to come and meet us please email the service directly.

Llwyngwian Fawr, Gwynedd (Tuesday 13th June) LlwyngwianFawr@regard.co.uk

Whitehatch, Horley, (Wednesday 14th June) Whitehatch@regard.co.uk

Portland Street, Kings Lynn (Thursday 15th June) PortlandStreet@regard.co.uk

OWL Town Farm Workshop, Sixpenny (Friday 16th June) TFWCranborne@regard.co.uk

Garthowen, Ceredigion (Friday 16th June) Garthowen@regard.co.uk

Fleetwood House, Littlehampton (Friday 16th June) Fleetwood.house@regard.co.uk

Cerrig Camu, Gwynedd (Friday 16th June) CerrigCamu@regard.co.uk

Starboard House, Woolston (Friday 16th June) Starboard@regard.co.uk

Inglewood House, Camberley (Friday 16th June) Inglewood@regard.co.uk

Cloverdale House, Hove (Friday 16th June) Cloverdale.House@regard.co.uk

Faerdre, Ceredigion (Friday 16th June) Faerdre@regard.co.uk

Uplands House, Gwent (Sunday 18th June) Uplands@regard.co.uk

Woodlands, Cornwall (Monday 19th June) Woodlands@regard.co.uk

Kingsdown House, Strood (Friday 23rd June) Kingsdown.House@regard.co.uk

Bay Lodge, Holbech (Friday 23rd June) Bay.Lodge@regard.co.uk

Beech Trees, Woking (Saturday 1st July) Beech.Trees@regard.co.uk

Beudygwyn Farm, Amlwch (Thursday 15th June) Beudygwyn@regard.co.uk

Arundel House, Frinton-On-Sea (Saturday 29th July) Arundel.House@regard.co.uk

Ivers House, Marnhull (Saturday 5th August) Ivers.house@regard.co.uk

Homeleigh, Crumpsall (Date TBC) Homeleigh@regard.co.uk

Beech Trees


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Homeleigh


Homeleigh

We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Ivers House


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We are holding an event in July for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Beudygwyn Farm


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Garthowen


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Faerdre


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Arundel House


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We are holding an event in July for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Llwyngwian Fawr


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Llwyngwian is a detached small holding situated among six acres of hillside, which is a short drive but within walking distance from the

Whitehatch


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Specialism Adults with learning disability, some of whom may have additional conditions, for example, autism, complex epilepsy or mobility issues. Some present challenging

Portland Street


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

OWL Town Farm Workshop


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Cerrig Camu Residential Service


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Starboard House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Inglewood House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Cloverdale House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Woodlands


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Kingsdown House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Bay Lodge


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Regard wins ‘Specialist Care Provider of the Year’ in the HealthInvestor Awards


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The Regard Group has been named ‘Specialist Care Provider of the Year’ in the 2017 national awards of HealthInvestor magazine which recognise achievement in the business of healthcare by a huge range of organisations, ranging from financial and property advisers, to clinical services and technology providers.

The judges said: “The Regard Group made great strides in 2016, under the leadership of its charismatic CEO, which saw circa 10% organic growth, and an extended new service pipeline, notwithstanding marshalling a high profile merger consolidation, and receiving independent recognition for enhancing its quality assurance programs.

“The Regard Group stood out in evidencing a step change in its approach to care, over and above comfort and safety. Through focusing on performance measurement it demonstrated its ability to bring meaningful change to the lives of its clients and in doing so has built an economically sustainable business model to support the financial pressures of commissioners.”

Regard’s CEO, Sandie Foxall-Smith, said: “We are delighted to have been named as the winning ‘Specialist Care Provider’ in what the organisers have acknowledged as the most competitive year in the awards’ 11 year history.

“We should be especially proud of ourselves because we faced stiff competition from eight other companies in our category, and it’s great recognition of, and reward for, the hard work I know everyone at Regard has put in over the past year.

“To be named by HealthInvestor as the top specialist care provider is a wonderful independent endorsement of the way Regard succeeds in combining the provision of excellent care with sound commercial business principles.”

Judges considered deals that all nominees had been involved in during the past year. For Regard this included the opening and prompt occupation of 12 new services, the success of which was attributed to their careful monitoring of and targeted response to, relevant local authorities’ demands.

Regard now supports 1,016 individuals across the country – a new record for the care-provider - and has introduced 110 new beds in the last two years as a result of new service launches. A further 12 new openings are planned by mid-2018.

Sandie Foxall-Smith, who was included in HealthInvestor’s Power Fifty List in 2016, said:

“Despite the market being very tough at the moment, Regard is growing steadily across the country - both occupancy-wise and business-wise – and it’s a very exciting time for us.

“This award is the icing on the cake – we were so pleased by the positive feedback we received.”

Judges said they were impressed by the way the Regard Group’s investment team demonstrated innovation and excellence in the deals they worked on over the past year, and in the quality of the care the organisation provides to clients, which was described as ‘the best care for adults with learning or physical disabilities or mental health problems’.

Highlights from Regard’s winning entry included ambitious projects such as nationwide implementation of a pioneering method of data capture developed in-house; innovative training in positive behaviour support (now on a six-year national roll-out); Institute of Leadership Management accreditation tor their internally-run ‘Managing People at Work’ programme; excellent client support exemplified by their benefits team; and meticulous quality control by the in-house audit team.

Cerrig Cornel win our annual ‘Golden Thread’ Award


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Our Cerrig Cornel service in North West Wales is celebrating after being declared overall winner in our annual award scheme due to its ‘outstanding attitude to teamwork and the team’s consistently positive attitude’.

The Regard Group’s quarterly in-house awards scheme is topped off every summer with its ‘Golden Thread’ award celebrating the staff team that best works together to achieve the organisation’s vision and mission.

The inspiration for this top award came from a quote in the report which helped earn Regard its Investors in People ‘Gold’ status in 2015: ‘There is a golden thread leading from the strategy to each service and department.’

In winning the award the team at Cerrig Cornel has faced off stiff competition from Regard’s 148 other services nationwide, and earned organisation-wide recognition of its outstanding teamwork and drive for continuous improvement.

Cerrig Cornel, which is based in Llanegryn, near Tywyn and provides 24-hour support for people with learning disabilities, mental health issues and physical impairment, is headed by service manager Simon Moore.

“Simon and his team provide an exceptional standard of care for the people they support,” said Regard’s chief executive officer Sandie Foxall-Smith.

“We have received consistently positive feedback in writing from family members of the people that are supported by the service to say how happy their relatives are at Cerrig Cornel.

“We have also received praise from Gwynedd Council’s care team on Simon’s ‘respectful and considerate’ approach ‘towards clients and staff alike’ and his ‘lovely team of staff’.”

Julie Davies, locality manager for Regard in Wales and the North West, praised the service for its positive attitude.

“The team are constantly offering encouragement – suggesting ways in which they can improve life for the individuals who live there,” said Julie.

“The communication between staff is second to none and they are all extremely competent and dedicated.

“Each individual staff member consistently promotes a ‘can do’ attitude enabling service users to achieve many things they initially thought impossible.

“As a team they have redecorated the property’s barn area, and taken the initiative to source a pool table and sofas to make it a comfortable happy place for people to go.”

To mark their success Simon and his team were given a trophy, along with a ‘Golden Thread’ award certificate at a special party for staff and the people they suppport.

Cerrig Cornel, which occupies a traditional 19th century Welsh farmstead, has been converted to provide a range of separate households with modern interiors.

The service is located in a rural setting which offers peace and tranquillity, and has stunning views of the Dysynni Valley.

Cerrig Cornel


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Specialism: The service is registered to provide support to people who have learning disabilities, including those with Autism/Asperger syndrome. The service can

A voice for people with learning disabilities in the General Election 2017


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Making your own decisions

The team at our Crystal House service in Bromley are supporting four individuals who live their to make sure their voices are heard at the upcoming general election.

Crystal House is home to young people who are in transition from residential college, foster care or the family home.

Senior support worker Diane Liston says the service has made sure the group are all registered to vote on June 8.

“The election is providing us with a great opportunity to demonstrate to people with learning difficulties and mental health needs that they have a voice,” said Diane.

“Usually those who find decision-making difficult are in that position because they have never been given the opportunity.

“Within Regard we challenge that every day, enabling people to move along a pathway where they can make ever more decisions for themselves.”

Just like the rest of the electorate, the individuals who live at Crystal House are receiving numerous leaflets through the door from the various political parties, and looking at what they all have to say.

Diane said: “The people who live here like watching the news together, and sitting around the dinner table in a group talking about what’s going on in the world.

“We try to prompt discussions all the time. Our task is then to support them to make decisions for themselves.

“Having the ability to vote is a fundamental right in a democracy and every person has the same power as the next person to affect the result.”

According to Diane the ‘hot issues’ among the group are the lack of litter bins on Penge High Street, a more reliable public transport service and fixing uneven pavements.

Crystal House, run by Regard, the UK’s fourth largest care provider, aims to support people the people who live there to develop their independence.

Statistics released by Mencap show that only a third of people with learning disabilities vote.

Crystal House


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Specialism: Supported living service for young people with learning disabilities and/or autism in transition from residential college, foster care or the family

Lamar, from Rhyme House, plans his perfect day


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An individual we support has been managing severe anxiety levels is now making ‘great progress’ after moving to one of our residential services in Sittingbourne.

Lamar Romans-Smith, a young man on the autistic spectrum, left the family home in July to live at Rhyme House in Chaucer Road which supports people with learning disabilities.

Ten months on Lamar enjoys going out and living alongside his house mates, and his key worker, Chelsea Bosley, supports him to manage his anxiety using a planner which is organised by Lamar himself to arrange his day.

“Lamar has his own magnetic photographs which staff support him to choose to stick on his planner according to what he is going to do that day,” said Chelsea.

“He typically fills in the planner after breakfast, and then again after lunch. Being able to visualise the day ahead of him has drastically reduced Lamar’s anxiety levels.

“Because he now feels more secure, he is much more flexible and able to handle any changes to his routine more easily.”

Chelsea says Lamar, who moved to the service from London, is now less rigid and better able to concentrate.

He enjoys a variety of activities in the community, including weekly swims and going to Gravity Trampolining Park in Maidstone.

“Lamar’s family are delighted by how well is doing and can’t believe how much he has settled and developed,” added Chelsea.

“Rhyme House staff support him to do the weekly house shop, and occasionally he cooks for everyone. He is a very capable all-rounder, and is making such great progress. We are all really proud of him.”

Lamar’s mother Pamela, said: “This is amazing to me because Lamar could never accept changes. Since his diagnosis in early autism any change would cause a huge explosion in his behaviour.

“I’m so glad I decided to put my trust in all the brilliant hard working staff at Rhyme House, and with all their expertise in autism I believe that Lamar will continue to make progress.”

Rhyme House provides accommodation for up to 10 young people, aged between 18 and 28, and includes a self-contained flat.

The service provides 24-hour background core support, including a sleep-in night member of staff and background staff during the day.

Rhyme House currently has a vacancy for a large first floor room with shared bathroom. For further information contact Theresa Cook on 07812 072043 or visit the service page below.

Rhyme House


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Transitional Service

Specialism: Learning disability, autism and behaviours that may challenge.

Details of Vacancy: Large first floor room with

Martin is having the time of his life living independently


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Martin has spent most of his adult life living in care services and hospitals across the country is now leading an independent life in the community in rural Lincolnshire.

He has a number of physical and mental health needs, but is now being supported to live in his own self-contained one-bedroom bungalow.

Locality manager for Lincolnshire, Katrina Greff said: “Martin is quite a character. When he first came here he said he was so happy that every day was like Christmas Day.

“He loves to go out and about seeing the sights, and visiting the seaside at Skegness and Great Yarmouth. He is a real ‘people person’ and is the life and soul wherever he goes.

“For someone who has spent most of his life in care units, to see him settled in his own home, living his own life, and making his own decisions is inspiring.

“Since moving into his own home, Martin has been on holiday, had barbecues and parties at his flat..

“It may all seem like simple things to most people, but they are so important to Martin, and are things he was unable to do before.”

Martin has cerebral palsy, epilepsy, a mild learning disability, complex needs and is fed directly into his stomach through a special ‘peg’ device.

Over the past year, the team have focussed on developing Martin’s independent living skills, which include managing his own medication, washing his clothes and keeping his home clean and tidy.

Kat Greff said: “Although he is unable to eat food himself, he adores baking for other people or having a barbecue. He absolutely delights in preparing things for people to enjoy.”

For further information on similar vacancies in the area please email Helen Petitdemange at: Helen.Petitdemange@regard.co.uk or call her on: 07944 105428.

Positive Practices in Social Care and Organisation Design – IABA Conference


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In June this year James Kiamtia-Cooper, Head of Behaviour Support at The Regard Group will be attending the IABA’s 9th International conference in Dublin. James will be presenting on positive practices in social care and organisation design.

Along with Linda Ribbands, Locality Manager at Regard, James will be presenting on the subject of: ‘Operating an integrated organisational approach utilizing the multi-element model to enhance the lives of individuals who challenge’ which draws upon the theory base of Gary LaVigna (who is internationally renowned for his work in behavioural management and social care quality review).

The talk will highlight Regard’s approach to “Pursuing Excellence in Person-Centred Care” (presented at House of Lords – UK Government, 2016) underpinned by inclusion of the key principles of the multi-element model in organisational design. The focus will be on an overview of the operational management, organisational structure and the organisational approaches to systems based practices that underpin this model.

To read more about the conference please click here

James will also be presenting at the Proact-Scipr-UK national conference this September on the related subject of ‘Utilising an integrated approach to enhance the lives of individuals who challenge’ - which aims to shine spot light on whole approach in providing a local, personalised model of care.

To view details of the Proact-Scipr-UK conference please click here.

Football focus helps Paul, from West Street, achieve his goals


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Paul’s determination to achieve his personal development goals, backed by staff from West Street where he lives, is yielding great results.

Paul is a huge football fan, so staff at West Street have used that as a motivator in identifying which skills needed working on to give Paul access to new opportunities and greater independence.

Gemma Watson, who leads the team, said: “Since October last year when Paul joined us, we have been supporting him to learn to interact better with other people, and develop his independent living skills.

“With support, he decided he’d like to enrol for some activities at Facet College in March, and he now thoroughly enjoys going there every week to play footie and take part in art classes.”

Paul - a devoted Manchester United fan – has become the star goal-keeper for Facet Football Team, and regularly accompanies them to participate in tournaments in Cambridge.

And at his weekly art classes, Paul has had a great time making a papier-maché model of Man United’s stadium, Old Trafford (pictured).

Paul’s keyworker Anne-Marie O’Sullivan said: “Both these things have given Paul an enormous sense of achievement, as well as an opportunity to socialise and meet new people.

“Before he joined us he used to find interacting with others very challenging, but with the right support he has come on in leaps and bounds.”

To help Paul get started, staff took him to have a look at the college and find out about the different activities that might suit him, as well as supporting him with travel training. He continues to receive high levels of support but this is enabling him to develop his skills further.

West Street, has recently been completely redeveloped and refurbished to offer self-contained accommodation in three two-bedroom flats and a one-bedroom flat. There are currently vacancies in each of the three two-bedroom flats.

Gemma and her team support the people who live at West Street to attend adult education courses like Paul, as well as to find supported employment and take part in other meaningful daytime activities to help them develop and maintain new skills in a friendly and supportive environment.

The house is located close to Wisbech town centre and all local amenities, allowing the people who live there to take an active part in community life. Details are available from Helen Petitdemange on 07944 105 428, or visit the service page below.

West Street


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Specialism: Adults with learning disabilities and more complex needs.

Details of vacancy: Two bedroom self-contained flats

Age range: 18 years +<

Livingstone Road’s one-man show for Headway


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Paul, who is making the slow recovery back from a brain injury following a fall in 2007, is holding his second one-man show at a community centre in Gillingham.

Paul has decided to hold another auction after the huge success of last time, which raised £400 for Headway.

Paul will auction his paintings at the Sunlight Centre in Richmond Road at 1.30 pm on Wednesday 10th May, with money raised to be donated to the head injuries charity Headway.

Paul, who lives at our Livingstone Road supported living service likes to create still-life portraits of everyday objects.

“People who have had a brain injury like me, I just want to say to them that there is a chance they can get better like I have,” he said.

Livingstone Road service manager, Heather Jupp said Paul had only taken up art in recent years and it was now playing an important role in his life.

“Painting enables him to relax and put any day to day concerns from his mind and helps him concentrate and focus,” said Heather.

“The staff at Livingstone Road have seen a real difference in him as a result and we are all so thrilled for him.

The auction will also include refreshments.

Livingstone Road supports adults with Acquired Brain Injury and varying degrees of cognitive, physical, behavioural and emotional difficulties.

It has nine single rooms over three floors with a communal kitchen, lounge and dining room and a garden.

For further information visit: www.regard.co.uk or for referrals call: 0800 840 0313.

Livingstone Road


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Specialism: Supported Living Service in Gillingham, Kent supporting adults with a traumatic or non-traumatic Acquired Brain Injury and varying degrees of cognitive, physical,

Care Markets meets Sandie Foxall-Smith


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Sandie Foxall-Smith, chief executive of The Regard Group, tells Care Markets what she thinks the key to good leadership is, the difficulties faced by small-scale operators, and why she is not afraid to put on a pair of rubber gloves and get stuck into cleaning a toilet.

How did you come to work in social care?

I’ve worked in health care for 20 years but fell into social care when I was head-hunted for this job by a blue chip company which knew I did a lot of charitable work.

I’ve always done charitable work, both in this sector and with the homeless, and I’m a past ‘Prince of Wales Ambassador’ for the homeless.

Learning disabilities care is fabulous and I love it. Every day is rewarding, and every day is different. We have 1,100 clients to look after, so no two people, personalities or behaviour are the same. Our work is very challenging, but very fulfilling. I am lucky because I have some fantastic staff and we’ve achieved a huge amount in the nearly five years I’ve been at the helm.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing your business at the moment?

There isn’t enough joined-up writing between health care and social care. We get challenged on our fees like everyone else, and we are not seeing the precept figures coming through to us from the Government even though we tell them our wages, food and utilities bills have all increased.

I can understand why this happens - they need to stretch their budget as far as possible, but any reduction in our income means an economy has to be made somewhere. So that might mean some of the vulnerable people we support can no longer go swimming every week, or we have to withdraw another activity they enjoy - because we have to cut our cloth according to our means.

However these kind of interesting and enjoyable activities add value to their lives, and they so look forward to them. When you start cutting back on the things they enjoy, their behaviour changes and that is not good either.

The biggest struggle is going to be the social care budget. Our homes are just that – homes. They are not big care homes or institutions, and running a home with just five people can be very expensive.

A big challenge for the sector will be that the smaller companies will go out of business, and there will be a reduction in available beds. Then we really are going to be stuck.

The demographics in our business are changing significantly too. It used to be that people came to us for care or they stayed with mum and dad. But mum and dad are ageing, and are less able to care for their adult children as they used to.

And our demographics are changing, too. One of our clients who, sadly, passed away recently was 96 years old. That was almost unheard of in learning disabilities years ago, because people with learning disabilities often had other medical conditions which meant a shorter-than-average life expectancy. But advances in medical care mean that is no longer true.

So now, not only have they got learning disabilities, they are elderly as well.

Last year, you were named Leader of the Year by Investors in People. What is the most important quality to being a good leader?

Yes, winning was a bit of a shock. I wasn’t paying attention when the award was announced and I didn’t even hear my name mentioned. My staff all screamed and had to give me a nudge in the direction of the stage.

In our line of work you have to genuinely care about what you do. You live and breathe the sort of care we deliver. My job isn’t about driving a fancy car or playing golf every week while my staff are left to do all the work. I care passionately about what I do, and I remain hands-on.

So yes, I will spend three hours on the road driving to a care home in the middle of nowhere just to make sure I’m happy with it.

And I strongly believe in leading by example. If your employees see you actively engaged all day, every day, it is amazing how that filters down and what cohesion it inspires among your work-force.

I don’t mind cleaning a toilet. I’ve done it before, and I’ll do it again if I need to. Why wouldn’t you just get a pair of rubber gloves and get on with it if necessary? The staff think that’s wonderful.

You can inspire that level of commitment in your staff and expect them to reciprocate if they know you’re prepared to get stuck in yourself.

The way we deliver care is changing, moving increasingly to delivery in home situations and coaching of vulnerable clients in the life skills they need. That might mean teaching them how to catch a bus into town, or to spend wisely the £5 a day they have to go shopping.

Our aim is to ensure everybody’s life is fulfilled so when, as a boss, you encourage people to pursue that goal, and train them to do it, and bang the drum about it all the time, that helps make you a good leader.

What Makes Regard different to others?

We ensure all our homes are real homes. Everyone has choice and if they want a purple room they can have one because it’s their home. It’s those sorts of things that make a difference.

Regard trains everybody whether they are a carer, cleaner or client. We give them as many skills as possible to enable them to have the best life they can. And that is a culture that IIP (Investors in People) recognises and that we live and breathe by.

I even write birthday cards to all my managers and then everyone sees that’s how it should be. Everybody in the organisation gets a birthday present, and we look after them.

What is The Regard Group’s strategy when it comes to growing its residential care estate?

We agree with supported living and not just residential care. Clients have keys to their own bedrooms and to the front door. They often have tenancy agreements so it feels like their own home.

Can you imagine how satisfying it is for a parent of a less-abled child to see them with a set of keys to their own home? That it is amazing.

What barriers/challenges do specialist care providers, who typically have smaller homes than care home providers for older people, face when it comes to opening new homes?

It is finances again. When buying small homes you are competing with ordinary residential buyers. We can’t afford to buy any more homes in Twickenham, Richmond or Surrey because it is so expensive.

Renovation of re-purposed properties costs a lot too, and I think that will be a barrier moving forward.

I’d expect some small businesses to disappear because of the new living wage which – by the way—I entirely support. If you are not big enough to weather the storm and then suddenly your staffing bill goes up by 8%, that’s a massive pressure.

I also think Brexit will cause problems for the sector. Some areas have virtually no unemployment so if you open a care home there, who will want to work for a living wage?

About 15% of my staff don’t come from the UK, so it also has implications for how the sector will access new staff.

How do you incorporate the preferences of your service users into this process?

We do this in a lot of different ways.

They are heavily involved in their care plan, whether that is going for walks, swimming, making papier-mâché or going on holiday.

There’s menu-choosing, where they voice their preferences about a curry or a tapas night.

If we are interviewing for staff, a lot of the clients become involved in the hiring. If we can involve them, we will.

Everyone has their own personal development plan to illustrate what they might want to be able to do. That could be to go on a bus, a train, go to Paris or Disneyland.

These are their aspirations and we take all this into consideration and plan it with them.

We treat them like one of us. It is sometimes other people who treat those with learning disabilities differently.

After merging with ACH last year, what have been the challenges and benefits of bringing the two organisations together?

We were on the road permanently for a month meeting every single member of staff, because we believe that if you can touch and feel the new company that employs you it makes a massive difference.

We set up focus groups to look at both companies’ care plans and we picked the best from both. We wanted them to get fully involved, and that was really good.

The ACH staff have seen some benefits in their terms and conditions, and now receive bank holiday pay.

They have seen some positives in how we treat the clients, and ACH used to be all residential but now they have also adopted the supported living model.

If you could change one thing in the care sector what would it be?

For people with learning disabilities to be accepted just like everybody else is.

They have just as much right to funding as everybody else and I don’t see why we have to fight so hard to get it. But fight I will - for every penny and every vote they are entitled to. Our specially set-up benefits team achieves great results in this respect.

People with learning disabilities should not be the poor relations. They should have a certain standard of life just like everybody else.

Article first published in Care Markets April 2017

Reunion with family friends brings joy to Rachel from Kingsdown House


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Rachel Fuller’s life has just taken a turn for the better since she’s been reunited with long-standing family friends.

Rachel, who has learning difficulties and complex health needs, lives at one of our residential homes in Strood.

Andy Jupp, who manages Kingsdown House, said: “Rachel is so happy that we’ve managed to support her to re-establish contact with her friends.

“It took some detective work by us to track the couple down. They were a big part of Rachel’s early life and it means a lot to her that they have started meeting up again.

“We’ve seen a much smilier Rachel over the last six weeks. She says she values these friends as much as she would a biological family. She’s been on trips to the cinema with them, and out for a Chinese meal, and she loves having the chance to play with their two young sons.”

The recent reunion is just a part of the support strategy Andy and his team at Kingsdown House have brought into play to improve Rachel’s quality of life.

She has been supported to attend Mid Kent College in Rochester where she did an Independent Living Course which, among other things, has enabled her to start cooking for herself – as well as preparing the occasional ‘house’ lunch – and to take responsibility for her personal care.

Pottery classes, also at Mid Kent College, are a continuing passion, and Andy said she has produced some genuinely beautiful pieces including, recently, a glazed dish and a convincing model cow.

Rachel said: “I love my pottery sessions and the friends I’ve made there. We talk on the phone between classes, and we all enjoy being creative at college.”

Andy Jupp said: “Her friends are really important to Rachel, which is why we were so happy when we rediscovered her special family friends.

“She’s also a very capable young woman and we’re working hard to give her a chance to develop her skills. Recently she worked with us to decorate her bedroom and she’s really thrilled with the results. The ownership of projects like this is so important to Rachel and the other individuals we support.”

A big music fan, Rachel recently went with her senior support worker Natasha Boyle to one of the Olly Murs concerts at the O2 Arena.

“It was amazing,” she said.

For Andy Jupp, Rachel’s expressions of happiness are a reward in itself.

“Our job is to ensure the people we support live the best lives they can,” he said. “We know we’re delivering the kind of service we set out to when the people we support feedback that they’re loving life.”

Kingsdown House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

You’ve been hired!


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When it comes to recruiting new staff, we are always championing the on-going involvement of the people we support in the decision-making process.

We invite the individual(s) to sit in on face to face job interviews for staff vacancies as part of a process to identify the best candidate for the role.

Along with care users, the service puts together a set of questions and illustrations as pointers as to the kind of questions they might want to ask.

At Beudygwyn Farm residential service near Anglesey, Brian Williams, who has an Acquired Brain Injury, played a role in recruiting a new support worker.

Service manager, Gwenda Potter, said: “Brian is really keen on exercise, especially weights and boxing, and asked the interviewee what she thought about going to the gym and swimming.

“She told him she was very interested in healthy eating and all forms of exercise and that keeping fit played a huge part in her own life.

“She said she would be keen on taking the individuals who live here to special swimming sessions for people with disabilities, which obviously went down a treat!

“She was a big hit with Brian and the other people who live at the service and I’m delighted to say got the job and starts with us shortly.”

Meanwhile, at Ambleside residential service in Redhill, Surrey, support worker Steven Calleja proved a winner with house members because of his passion for football.

“When we interviewed Steven, a couple of care users showed him around the property as part of the interview process,” said service manager, Rebecca Cretten.

“It soon became evident that he was a massive football fan and they all struck a chord with each other immediately and there was a lot of banter.

“The lads here all support different teams – Crystal Palace, Arsenal and Chelsea – and Steven supports Newcastle United so it makes for some lively conversations.”

Angela Hurrell, who lives at the Caeronnen supported living service in Llangrannog in Ceredigion, has enjoyed playing an active part in the recruitment of support workers.

“Before the interview, we talked with Angela about some of the questions she might want to ask and to identify what was important for her,” said Katie Owen, who leads the team at Caeronnen.

“She joined the interview for about half an hour. She spent a lot of the time listening to what Stacey has to say and then had an informal chat with her.

“For Angela, it is important that we recruit someone whom she feels comfortable around and whether she thinks they will get on with her.

“Angela is semi-paralysed and needs support to dress and to shower herself, so it is vital that she feels staff understand the issues she faces.

“We all need to feel we have control over our lives; so having a say as to who supports you on a daily basis plays an important part in that.”

Angela also asked questions on behalf of fellow housemates at Caeronnen who have disabilities but lack the capacity to be involved in the recruitment process.

There are currently vacancies at Beudygwyn Farm, Ambleside and Caeronnen. For further information contact the referrals hotline on 0800 840 0313 or visit the service pages below.

Beudygwyn Farm


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Ambleside Lodge


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Specialism: Adults with moderate to severe learning disabilities, autism, behavioural difficulties.

Type of Service: Residential

Age Range: 18 to 28 years<

Caeronnen


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Specialism: The service supports adults with Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Learning Difficulties, Mental Health, or ABI, substance misuse issues or with a history of

Sisterly love triumphs over anxiety for Donjeta from Rosebank Lodge


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Donjeta, from our Rosebank Lodge residential care service in Mitcham, is a young woman with learning difficulties who is enjoying a happier lifestyle thanks to support from her sister and a specialist behaviour psychologist who teamed up to help her be better understood.

Donjeta Kaliquani, who is non-verbal, was displaying behavioural challenges so her sister Fitore Kaliquani and behavioural expert Francesca Gerald worked closely with her and the support team at Rosebank Lodge to turn things around.

After about six months of dedicated efforts, Donjeta is now calmer and settling down well in her new home.

Deputy service manager Victoria Rosiji believes the key to success has been their close co-operation with Fitore, who lives in nearby Croydon.

Victoria said: “Fitore was able to give us vital information about the best way to respond to Donjeta when she becomes agitated.

“She told us how her sister likes someone to sing to her when she is anxious, and to draw her pictures in the form of a social story to help her understand her emotions.

“She also explained how Donjeta loves it when someone reads to her, and we found this can really help calm her down if she is feeling agitated.”

The team at Rosebank Lodge have also put together ‘communication cards’ which Donjeta points to if there is something she would like to do, such as going into the sensory room or looking at a book.

Added Victoria: “This means she can ask us to read to her or for us to get her sister on the phone so she can hear her voice. It may seem small but it makes a huge difference.

“She is now much more involved in the running of the house and learning new skills such as drawing up menus, grocery shopping, and getting involved with preparing the evening meal.

Victoria’s team were coached by Francesca Gerald from our Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) service in how to promote proactive and supportive management of Donjeta’s behaviours, using the model ‘Proact-scipr-UK’ which underpins all our PBS work.

Mother-of-one Fitore, said she was delighted that Donjeta had settled down to life at Rosebank Lodge.

“Because of her learning disability and being non-verbal my sister often feels frustrated and agitated when she can’t express her needs.

“Working closely with support staff at Rosebank to help them understand how to communicate her needs is making a big difference.

“She is really beginning to enjoy life now and I feel confident that our coming together as a ‘team’ has really made a huge difference to Donjeta’s life.”

Rosebank is a residential home supporting young adults with learning disabilities who may also have associated complex behavioural needs, epilepsy and or autism.

Our PBS training is available for all 149 services nationwide and focuses on exploring what the impetus might be for different expressions of a person’s behaviour, then by using continual and reflective practice they adapt their approaches to suit the person and deliver their best possible quality of life. For further information see www.regard.co.uk/pbss-page

Rosebank Lodge


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Specialism: Rosebank is a residential home supporting young adults with learning disabilities who may also have associated complex behavioural needs, epilepsy and or

The Regard Awards – Celebrating Excellent Support - Winners for this quarter


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A big congratulations to our final quarterly award winners of the year. We will be announcing our annual winners later this month, along with the winner of our Golden Thread award.

Outstanding Team

Winners: Faerdre Team, Wales and North West

Hannah Lumby nominated her team saying, ‘I feel that they excel in the support they provided the service users within the home. Faerdre is a homely environment with a laid back approach – which can be felt as soon as you step through the door. The service users have control in the running of their home and this is always promoted by the staff. We remember that the people we support do not live in our work place, we work in their home. Faerdre has a very person-centred way of working, staff always promote the choices that individuals make and in turn this enables them to gain independence in all aspects of their lives and have complete control in all decision making. My team know it is important to connect with the service users who sometimes think very differently to them. The staff are caring, patient people who enjoy helping others, showing great empathy; they are sensitive to needs of the people that they support and never push their own views and opinions.

As the manager of Faerdre I feel that this award would help show appreciation to the staff team. It would give them the job satisfaction that they deserve and to help them to know they are valued no matter how tough and long days are. The staff team are the heart of Faerdre, and I for one will always honour their hard work and commitments. I feel privileged to be part of an amazing team of people that have such an important and significant daily role in the lives of others.‘

Shortlisted:

The East Team – East

HR Team, Kingston Office - Kingston Office

Ravenscroft Team - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Continuous Improvement

Winner: Lauren Linnell, Support Worker, Manor Barn, Wales and North West

Lauren was nominated Andy Bentley for her positive attitude, caring nature and her swift development from new starter to DRP. Andy said, ‘Since Lauren joined Regard in April 2016 she has excelled herself and always faces the daily tasks within the service with a smile, ensuring the service users are at the heart of all she does. Lauren has been a constant source of support, has led shifts, organised allocations, reviewed PDOs and care plans and helped bring structure to the service.

Lauren’s attitude is one of positivity and determination and her empowerment of the service users and direction in leading the staff team has been fluent and consistent. She is also a constant source of new ideas with which to improve the service we provide and also ways in which to develop herself.’

Shortlisted:

Ambleside Lodge Team - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Kelly Prosser, Service Manager, Domcare South Wales - Wales and North West

Kingsdown Team - Kent and East Sussex

Tolworth Team - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Living Our Values

Winners: Oak Lodge and Hillview Teams, Kent and East Sussex

Caroline Robins nominated the Oak Lodge and Hillview teams saying, ‘I am nominating two teams – Oak Lodge and Hill View to share the award as they are on the same site and usually share the same manager.

Since October 2016, they have been without a manager on a day to day basis to support them and guide them. However, the services have continued to uphold high standards, keeping the needs and wishes of the people they support as their top priority. Rather than becoming weaker, the teams have become stronger because they have joined forces to work together and support each other. They work harmoniously overall and describe themselves as all being a cog that turns a wheel to make sure that things run smoothly.

The staff are always looking for new activities for people to enjoy. One support worker even grew his beard over Christmas, to become Santa for the day, which gave everyone great enjoyment.

After a recent review chaired by one of the seniors, the care manager came and found me and commented that the service was the best that she had seen it and that it looked lovely and homely, people were comfortable in their environment. She also noticed that one person’s behaviours had significantly decreased as she seemed more settled. This is an absolute credit to the team there.

The team believe in high standards and when they had a quality audit, they wanted to get those actions closed as soon as possible and worked to achieve this. They deserve this award for their continued compassionate care, hardworking attitude and commitment to high standards’

Shortlisted:

The Lodge Team - South West & Dorset

Gordon Avenue Team - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Clare Searle, Senior Support Worker, Harwich House - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Sail Close Team – East

Sam Long, Service Manager, Springfield House - Kent and East Sussex

Deborah Harper, Support Worker, Waverley Avenue - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Aleksandra Sukpe, Deputy Manager, Whitehatch - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Ali Bear Brady, Administrator, Wren Park - London, Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire

Faerdre


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Manor Barn


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Specialism: The service supports male adults with enduring Mental Health needs and/or Learning Difficulties, Asperger’s, Autism or ABI who would benefit

Oak Lodge


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Oak Lodge is a six bedded purpose built bungalow, residential home for adults with physical and learning disabilities and is staffed 24 hours a

Hillview


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Hillview is a six bedded built residential home for adults with Physical and Learning disabilities and is staffed 24 hours a day. It is

Canal View Open Day is a roaring success


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The team at Canal View, our new supported living service in Rochdale, recently welcomed many families and social workers to the newly refurbished service.

The event was attended by young people looking for supported living accommodation, the majority of whom were accompanied by their care managers and families. Local representatives from commissioners and learning disability teams from Rochdale, Oldham, Bury, Salford and Cheshire East also attended. Diane Carole, Regard’s customer relationship manager, who talked them said. ‘People were impressed with the property, Regard’s ethos and staff team as well as taking comfort from the size of the organisation and the support services it provides.’

Many of the people who attended commented how homely Canal View feels and some of the young people even chose their rooms and asked how soon they could move in!

Anthony attended the open day and was shown around the various bedrooms. He loved them all and said he would be more than happy with any of the available rooms. He moved in on Monday 27th March and settled in immediately.

Michael came and said he loved the house and chose a large double bedroom with en-suite then sat with staff and enjoyed some of the buffet. His placement has since been confirmed, but staff are undertaking specialist Epilepsy training before he can move in.

Rachel chose the bedroom with the largest built in wardrobes saying, ‘I’ve got a lot of clothes!’

Everyone enjoyed a tour of the service which will support adults with learning difficulties, autism and/or mental health needs, who would benefit from living in their own space. All individuals will benefit from a bespoke care package to suit their needs, plus background support. The local team are experienced in managing complex and challenging behaviours.

Lillian Kidd service manager for Canal View was overwhelmed with how lovely the service looked and how well the open day was attended. She said she felt ‘very proud and quite emotional’ at the end of a long and busy day.

The Canal View team worked hard to finalise care packages as quickly as possible after the event and the first person moved in the following Monday. The service is expected to be full by the end of April.

For further information please click the link below or call Diane Carole on 07984 736457.

Canal View


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Specialism: The service supports adult males with Learning Difficulties/Autism and/or Mental Health Needs, who would benefit from living in their own

Independence Day for Jon and Sharon thanks to Highdowns


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Two friends from Cornwall are celebrating leaving residential care to live in the community.

Jon Barnes and Sharon Murley both left Highdowns near Camborne – where they have lived for nine years and 10 years respectively – to move to a village near Redruth.

The pair now live at Meadow View, a new supported living service run by care provider Regard, and are already active members of the local community.

Jon and Sharon, who both have Asperger’s Syndrome, were supported to take their first steps towards independence by the care team at Highdowns.

Initially, the friends lived in the main house at Highdowns before eventually moving into self-contained cottages in the grounds of the 10 acre farm.

Said Highdowns deputy manager, Colin Jull: “It was really important for them to learn life skills in order to ease the transition into independent living.

“These included things like cleaning, shopping for groceries, preparing and cooking meals and learning how to manage a budget.

“Being involved in the running of a house meant learning new skills and helped give them confidence and a sense of fulfilment.

“It all takes time, but we knew they were both capable of independent living and that it was a question of supporting them until they felt they were ready.”

Jon and Sharon moved into Meadow View service in November.

The property, which has 24-hour staffing, is made up of two self-contained flats, plus a main house with six en-suite bedrooms and large communal areas.

It provides homes for people with autism, moderate to severe learning disabilities and complex needs, moving from residential care, family home or educational establishments.

Jon now has a job at his local Tesco in Pool which involves working on stock rotation and unpacking deliveries and also attends a day centre in Stithians.

Meanwhile Sharon works at the Kernow Animal Welfare shop in Camborne and also attends the Crackermac activity centre.

Leah Bone, Regard Domcare manager South West, said: “We are delighted to see Jon and Sharon settling in so well and enjoying life.

“We aim to work with the people who live at our services to encourage the development of life skills and support them to integrate within the wider community.”

Highdowns is around two miles from Camborne with views over St Ives Bay, and has a barn which provides communal recreation opportunities for people who live on the properties on site.

The service supports individuals with learning disabilities, mental health issues and other concurrent complex needs.

There is currently a vacancy at the Highdowns service. For further information contact service manager Jenna Betts on 01209 832261 or email: Highdowns@regard.co.uk. Alternatively you can visit the service page below.

Highdowns


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Specialism: Learning Disabilities, Mental Health issues and other concurrent complex needs. Individuals with Asperger’s and/or other Autistic spectrum conditions and Individuals

Meadow View


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Specialism: Meadow View is a new supported living service designed to offer support and accommodation for adults with learning disabilities, autistic spectrum conditions,

Charity fundraising turns supporters purple across Regard


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Over a third of our 149 services across England and Wales are planning local fundraisers for Purple Day (Sunday 26 March) in aid of Epilepsy Action, the UK’s leading epilepsy organisation, with some of them already ahead of the action.

This year sees the ninth celebration of Purple Day, an international annual theme day aimed at dispelling the myths surrounding epilepsy and raising awareness in a positive manner.

Members of Regard’s OWL Town Farm Workshop in Sixpenny Handley, Dorset, raised nearly £70 through a variety of fun craft-based activities.

Workshop manager, Helen Ritson, said: “Lots of people tried their hand at hula hoop weaving and added some purple fabric to our still-to-be-completed community collage.

“We decorated cakes with purple icing - then scoffed them, obviously!

“It was great to see everyone in their purple clothes, faces were painted and - most importantly - we raised money for a great cause and had lots of fun at the same time.”

OWL Town Farm Workshop provides craft, drama, IT, photography sessions and literary classes for 36 people with learning disabilities, and sells their products at craft markets and festivals across the country. OWL stands for Outcomes With Learning.

Meanwhile in Dyffryn Ardudwy, North Wales, the people who live at Regard’s Llwyngwian Fawr service organised a sheep race, starring Wilma and Daisy, two sheep who first arrived at the service as ‘rescued lambs’ in 2015 and have been firm favourites with the people who live there ever since.

Service users and staff raised £12 betting on the sheep, who were adorned with purple ribbons. Daisy was the winner.

Regard’s CEO Sandie Foxall-Smith said: “A significant number of the people with learning disability and mental health issues we support nationwide have epilepsy as an additional health challenge, so we welcome the opportunity to contribute to awareness-raising and fundraising for Epilepsy Action.

“There are purple tea parties with face-painting and themed food at a many of our services, and even a purple talent show. Wherever possible the events are being run with the involvement of the local community, because community involvement is so important to the people we support.

“We recognise that the social contact aspect of helping and working with others can have a profound effect on a person’s overall psychological well-being, so we try to ensure that everyone we support has the opportunity to be involved in charity fundraising like this.

“Our final tally for funds raised is still awaited – many of the activities aren’t taking place until next week.”

Phillip Lee, chief executive of Epilepsy Action, said: “It’s fantastic to see so many people nationwide turning their world purple to raise funds for Epilepsy Action. We couldn’t do what we do without the help of people like this.”

Epilepsy affects around one in every 100 people in the UK and 87 people are diagnosed with the condition every day.

OWL Town Farm Workshop


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Llwyngwian Fawr


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Llwyngwian is a detached small holding situated among six acres of hillside, which is a short drive but within walking distance from the

Self-image boost in confidence for Heather from Latymer House


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Carers are supporting Heather who is battling severe anxiety to access her local community.

Heather Breen, who has a learning disability and is on the autistic spectrum, moved to Latymer House care service in Redhill last April.

Latymer manager, Martin McGibbon, said: “When Heather came to us she was very anxious about leaving the house and experiencing new things.

“I am delighted to say 10 months on she is really beginning to find her feet and now takes part in two sessions a week at Bletchingley Activity Centre.”

Due to her disabilities Heather finds any changes of routine can result in her experiencing feelings of extreme anxiety.

Heather attends the centre, which is run by Surrey Choices, where she enjoys ‘self-image’ sessions, where she learns about hair and make-up, and an art and crafts class.

To support Heather, staff showed her photographs of Bletchingley, based in Stychens Lane, and practiced making the journey there and back on foot and by taxi.

Heather receives one-to-one support on her visits to the centre.

Added Martin: “One of Heather’s support workers works shifts there which meant that she would see a familiar face when she went to her classes.

“First of all she attended a few taster sessions to see what she would like to do and once she gained sufficient confidence, she chose which classes she wanted to do.

“I’m delighted to say her confidence levels are continuing to improve and we are absolutely thrilled she is making such great progress.”

Anne Shiels, Surrey Choices area operations manager, said that Heather was taking everything in her stride and making great progress.

“She joins in with the rest of the group and enjoys getting involved in conversations and having a laugh with her fellow classmates.

“She was very quiet when she first came here and kept herself to herself but little by little she is gaining self-belief. We have seen a marvellous improvement in her.”

In addition to her visits to Bletchingley, Heather also attends a local Zumba class with her family.

Latymer House currently has one vacancy in a ground floor room. The house is very close to the town centre and all local amenities. Details are available from Rod Brizzell on 07885 998240 or the service page below.

Bletchingley works with people who have learning disabilities and complex needs and supports them to enjoy classes including arts and crafts, exercise and independent cooking and living skills.

Latymer


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Specialism: Supported living service for people with learning disabilities and associated mental health needs.

Details of vacancy: Ground floor room available.<

Promise of fragrant summer days at Arundel House


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People with learning difficulties and complex health needs living in our Arundel House residential service in Frinton-on-Sea are looking forward to enjoying a fragrant new sensory garden in the grounds of their home this summer, thanks to a gift from the family of a former house-mate.

Delia Nassim was so impressed with the support and care her brother William Glasgow (pictured far left) received from the team at Arundel House in the 18 months he lived there before passing away last December, that, on behalf of his family, she has promised to fund the development of a sensory garden in the grounds of the home for the enjoyment of the other people they support.

Mrs Nassim said: “William was really well looked after by Pat Ward and her team, and we wanted to show our appreciation for the care he received at Arundel House in a way that would be of lasting benefit to everyone there.

“Several of the residents had been his companions and friends for many years, along with a number of the professionals who cared for him, and we would like to think that the planned garden will be a fitting and happy way for them and everybody at Arundel House to remember William.

“He lived at Arundel for nearly 18 months, but before then had spent a whole decade being supported by Regard which runs the service. He had a variety of complex health needs which they met admirably, and I always felt the staff made great efforts to find ways to enable him to live life to the full.”

Pat Ward, who manages Arundel House, said: “We all miss William very much and were so sad to lose him before Christmas.

“I’m incredibly proud of my team who did a fantastic job, coping with some very complicated health issues and always ensuring that he received the very best care possible.

“When William’s sister said that the family wanted to fund the development of a sensory garden as a way of saying ‘thank you’ we were all delighted.

“It will be a lovely way to remember William, and the people who live with us will really enjoy spending time outside in a tranquil space which caters for their specific needs.”

Staff are hoping that work on the new garden will be able to begin when the weather improves in the spring, so that it will be ready for the people who live at Arundel House to start to enjoy in the summer.

Pat Ward said: “Some of our residents would enjoy the opportunity to be involved in the planting of the new garden, and with ongoing maintenance, so this is another welcome aspect of the new garden.”

Most of those who live at Arundel House have enduring health needs, including some with the early onset dementia often associated with a learning disability.

However Pat and her team are passionate about supporting their service users to live life to the full, and they regularly support them on outings to local drop-in centres, day services, libraries and the pub, as well as lunches out and coffee mornings.

Meanwhile at home everyone is encouraged to be involved in the way Arundel House is run, through weekly menu-planning meetings, monthly residents’ meetings and involvement in regular health and safety committee meetings.

Arundel House accommodates 10 people in a large detached house with two dining rooms, a large lounge, a visitors’ room and a fully enclosed garden.

There are currently two vacancies at the service, both in en-suite bedrooms, accessible via a recently-installed lift.

Families and external professionals can learn more about the vacancies by contacting Helen Petitdemange on 07944 105 428 or visiting the service page below.

Arundel House


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We are holding an event in July for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Regard attends the UNCRPD periodic examination in Westminster


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Regard attends the UN Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) periodic examination in Westminster

Regard’s Head of Behaviour Support, James Kiamtia-Cooper, is attending a series of events hosted by the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) as the UK begins its first periodic examination of the UNCRPD. Conducted by the UN Committee for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the examination will consider the UK’s progress towards full implementation of the Convention.

At the first gathering members and stakeholders raised a number of priority issues and amendments to be taken back by UK Equality and Human Rights Commission to UN in Geneva. These included:

  • Areas around the impact of public expenditure in social care system (Article 19)
  • Accommodation needs including independent living (Article 9)
  • Employment for people specifically with learning disabilities
  • Health inequality in relation to people with learning disabilities (Article 25)
  • Discrimination of individuals with disabilities.

James Kiamtia-Cooper’s particular emphasis for comment (which was noted for review) underlined the seemingly commonplace use of restraint, seclusion and medication in secure health and care settings. In addition, James discussed the conventions obligation to focus upon proactive approaches in care which maximise the quality of life for the individuals who live in all care settings. This is in line with the core values of PBS and The Regard Group.

Additionally, it is crucial for the UNCRDP to consider how it will outline the prerequisite for regular review, to monitor use of medication and restraint (Article 15), in preference of less restrictive approaches such as positive behavioural support strategies. Indeed, a clear message for the need for evidential ‘restraint reduction process’ and how the mechanisms for ensuring the mismanagement of people with disabilities, concerning sedation or restraint is not lost under the convention. The Office for disability issues welcomes stakeholder involvement.

James Kiamtia-Cooper noted, “Days such as these area real pleasure to be involved in, particularly the debate and discussion that surrounds the event. It is important that The Regard Group continue to provide stakeholder involvement and input on issue that relation to national policy for people with disabilities.”

James will be attending further Westminster meetings which are scheduled for April and September.

Regard is in the final of the HealthInvestor awards


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With the awards now in their 11th year, HealthInvestor has acknowledged 2017 as the most competitive entry process yet.

The awards recognise achievement in the business of healthcare by a huge range of organisations, ranging from financial and property advisers, to clinical services and technology providers.

Regard, who has been named as a finalist in the category ‘Specialist Care Provider Of The Year,’ is the country’s fourth biggest private provider of care homes and supported living services.

Founded in 1994, the organisation employs over 2,200 direct care staff to support more than 1,100 service users with learning disabilities, mental health needs or acquired brain injuries at over 148 services nationwide. AC

Regard’s CEO, Sandie Foxall-Smith, said: “These awards provide an independent endorsement of the quality of the service we deliver and we’re delighted to have been selected as finalists, in the face of some very stiff competition.

“It’s important to us because these awards recognise that we are not only an excellent care-provider, but also a sound commercial business.

“Our guiding principle is that everything we do should come together to ensure we are continuously enabling the people we support and care for to lead more fulfilled lives, at the same time providing a rewarding working environment for our employees, within a business structure which is well-managed and prudently financed.

Regard is currently experiencing a period of growth, having opened 13 new services in 2016, with another three due to open during the first three months of 2017. These are all supported living services in response to demand from local authorities in different parts of the country.

Regard will join the other finalists to discover whether they are winners in their category at HealthInvestor’s prestigious annual awards ceremony at London’s Grosvenor House Hotel on 1 June 2017.

Meet the shabby chic ‘Whiz Kidz’ from Victoria and Grenville


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If you think old, unloved wooden chairs and coffee tables are only good for the tip, think again.

Thanks to a group who attend Whiz Kidz in Pennycross, Plymouth, they are now being transformed into the latest, must-have ‘shabby chic’ furniture.

The items are being upcycled by Kay Morgan, Leon Gough and Sandra Fuller (pictured) who live at our Victoria and Grenville House residential service in Victoria Terrace, in St Jude’s.

The trio all have weekly sessions at the activity centre where they restore and paint the pieces or cover them in decoupage.

The furniture is then sold to locally or via online sales sites. The group also make bird boxes.

Said Victoria and Grenville manager, Donna West: “They all really love coming to Whiz Kidz. It is the highlight of their week and they really look forward to it.

“They enjoy transforming something that has apparently out-lived its usefulness into something that is desirable and pleasing to the eye.

“Coming to the centre also means they get to learn how to use tools, develop new skills and improve their hand eye coordination.”

As well as developing their artistic abilities, an important element of Whiz Kidz is enabling group participants to engage with the local community on outings to buy or collect resources for projects, and to enjoy chatting with people who visit during group sessions.

In the summer they visit places of interest where, again, they are able to mix and interact with other visitors.

Staff from Victoria and Grenville House support the group to attend the activity centre – accompanying them to Pennycross and being on hand if they are needed.

Alan Jones, who runs Whiz Kidz with his partner Sue, said: “It is amazing to see their skills improve week by week. It is great to watch their self-confidence and concentration levels grow.

“Coming into a work setting and working alongside each other as co-workers also makes them feel they are part of a team, united in completing a common task.

“In addition, the environmental benefits of upcycling are really important – minimising the volume of discarded materials being sent to landfill and also reducing the need for new or raw materials.”

Whiz Kidz, set up six years ago by Alan and Sue, offers a range of programmes for young people, holiday clubs all with an educational theme, and job clubs and careers guidance for the unemployed.

Victoria and Grenville House supports adults who are vulnerable and have a learning disability, mental health issues, challenging behaviour and autistic spectrum disorder.

The service which occupies two Victorian terraced properties supports individuals to access community facilities including swimming, sport activities and Adult Education colleges.

For further information about Victoria and Grenville House, contact Guy Page on 07773 746 614 or visit the service page below.

Further information about Whiz Kidz, contact Sue or Alan on 01752 560 360 or email: info@wkuk.org

Victoria and Grenville


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Specialism: This service is specifically dedicated to providing support to adults who are vulnerable and have a learning disability, Mental Health Issues, Challenging

New horizons for Christopher, from Sheringham House


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When people say they could eat ‘anything’ they don’t normally mean it, but staff at Sheringham House know only too well that literally anything will be viewed as fair game by one of the autistic men they support.

Christopher, who has lived at Sheringham House since it opened in 2007, is non-verbal and has a disorder called Pica, which means he likes to eat non-food items. Although rare among the general population, Pica is one of the most common eating disorders in individuals with autism.

Christopher’s key worker, Amanda, said: “There is nothing Christopher wouldn’t consider eating, and staff have to monitor him constantly and always be on their guard.

“Naturally we take precautions to minimise the risk of Christopher eating something inappropriate, but I find the best approach is to be constantly alert to behavioural signals which indicate he’s about to eat something he shouldn’t, and be ready with an appropriate diversion.”

Amanda’s success in monitoring Christopher’s behaviour since she started working at Sheringham House in April has made it possible for him to go on regular outings and take part in activities which were previously considered too risky.

Amanda said: “A big part of the solution is to make sure that whenever we go out we’ve got a suitable supply of distractions with us, in case we encounter something that might trigger Christopher.

“He loves vending machines, but I’ll offer him a healthy snack instead of a bag of crisps and this usually works.

“He also really loves Coca Cola, but drinking too much of that wouldn’t be good. However if we allow him to hold a small bottle of Coke when he goes out, that keeps him very happy.”

When Amanda first started working with Christopher she found he needed a great deal of encouragement to go out, but with her support he now regularly enjoys outings to places like the Rare Breeds Centre in Ashford - where he especially enjoys petting the rabbits – Cyclopark in Gravesend, and trips to the pub.

Every Friday Amanda takes Christopher swimming in the pool at Shenstone School in Bexleyheath, where he used to be a pupil and where his mother is employed as an administrative assistant.

He recently travelled by train for the first time, an experience Amanda said he clearly enjoyed so long as he could sit with his back to the engine. Plans are now underway to organise a trip to London, and possibly a holiday later in the year.

Amanda said: “Perhaps the highlight of the last year was the birthday party we organised to celebrate him turning 30, with a bouncy castle, a visiting ‘petting zoo’ and party food decorated with varieties of edible ‘buttons’ because Christopher’s nickname is Button.”

She confesses to the occasional mishap, such as on a recent visit to a garden centre café when Christopher managed to sneak a large bite out of a whole coffee cake on the café counter.

“We had to buy the entire cake,” she said, “but on the up-side the other individuals who live at Sheringham House didn’t seem to mind sharing it with him when we got home.”

Amanda’s manager, Mark, said: “The progress Christopher has made since Amanda has been supporting him has been remarkable, and we’re so pleased to have her on the team.

“We all feel strongly that the people we support should have the same opportunities to go out and enjoy themselves as everyone else, so we develop bespoke care plans for each of them which enables them to live their lives to the full.”

There is currently a first-floor en-suite room available at the service, which can accommodate up to ten adults with learning disability, mental health and autism, and is staffed by a team experienced in managing complex and challenging behaviours.

Families interested in further details should contact Theresa Cook on 07812 072043 or visit the service page below.

Sheringham House


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Specialism: Adults with Learning disability, Mental Health and Autism and varying degrees of cognitive, physical, behavioural and emotional difficulties.

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Hannah ‘hits the jackpot’ at Tarvin


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With schools, businesses and charities nationwide holding events to mark ‘Time to Talk Day’ (9 February), the annual awareness day to get people talking about mental health, Hannah who lives at our Tarvin Road service is helping promote that understanding by sharing her own story.

One in four people will face a mental health problem at some point in their life and since it launched three years ago the Time To Talk campaign has sparked millions of conversations.

Hannah Williams, now aged 20 said: “My childhood wasn’t the best, and due to difficulties at home I moved out when I was only sixteen.

“I started off staying at my friend’s house for a week, and then I was taken into care homes and supported living up to the age of 17.

“While I was in the care system I went off the rails and started drinking heavily and self-harming, and I became suicidal. This meant I got detained under the Mental Health Act and spent time in a variety of secure settings which were horrible - I never want to do that again.

“When I got discharged off my section, my care coordinator offered me a variety of flats and supported living settings and I chose Tarvin Road near Chester.

“I feel like I hit the jackpot moving here, I’m really happy to have my own tenancy agreement as I have never had one before and it gives me security, stability, and my own home instead of a hospital. I’d be lost if I left here.

“The staff are very supportive and very caring and generous, they help me as much as I need help, and they’re always there if I need to talk and will always listen to me and help me.

“They also give me time and space when I want it, and encourage me to continue with my hobby, which is dancing. I have won two trophies and a medal for dance and really enjoy it.

“I now look back at the past but I don’t stare at it too long, then it doesn’t affect me. I feel free now to be me.”

Victoria Ramage, who leads the team at Tarvin, said: ”Hannah was the very first tenant to move into Tarvin, which is a newly-opened supported living service for adults with learning difficulties, mental health needs, Asperger’s or autism, including additional complex needs.

“She’s settled in so well, and it’s great to see how her self-confidence and self-esteem is blossoming.”

Regard, the organisation behind Tarvin, provides supported living and residential services for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and acquired brain injury, and cares for more than 1,100 people, with a dedicated staff of over 2,200 across 148 locations throughout the UK.

Just one vacancy now remains at the service, and Tarvin has been so positively received by local care managers that Regard is already exploring the possibility of developing further services of the same kind in the area in the near future.

Each of Tarvin’s three bedrooms has an en-suite bathroom, and there is also a self-contained first-floor flat and two ground-floor flats - one of which is wheelchair-accessible - a number of large internal communal areas, and spacious grounds.

The staff team focuses on promoting independence, supporting individuals to find employment opportunities and providing background support for those who can be more independent. They are experienced in managing complex and challenging behaviours.

Anyone interested in further details should contact Diane Carole on 07984 736 457.

Tarvin


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Specialism: The service supports adults with Learning Difficulties and/or Mental Health Needs, Asperger’s or Autism who would benefit from living in

Measuring success by growing independence at Crystal House


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For Joseph Osoba and his team at our supported living service in Penge, while it tugs at the heart-strings to say ‘goodbye’ to the individuals they support when they move out and start living independently, it is also a time for celebration.

“They all have learning disabilities and associated mental health issues, and they come to us for support in learning the skills that will enable them to live on their own, so when they’re ready to move on, it means we’ve done our job,’ Joseph said, “but it’s always hard to see them go.”

The latest success story from Joseph’s service, Crystal House, is Harrison, who lived at the service for just over a year.

Joseph said: “Harrison has learning difficulties and epilepsy, and is partially-sighted. He needed support to become self-sufficient with medication, as well as with other aspects of looking after himself.”

Travelling to and from college to study computing was one of the first things Joseph’s team helped Harrison to manage independently.

“At the beginning one of us would go on public transport with him, then we shadowed him until we were confident he was ‘travel-trained’ and able to make the journey safely on his own,” said Joseph.

Once the Crystal House staff and Harrison’s social services liaison officer were satisfied he was ready to ‘fly solo,’ they sorted an outreach package for him which enabled him to move out into his own flat, within walking distance of the home of a much-loved sister.

Joseph Osoba, said: “Now three of the other people who live with us are celebrating personal achievements, so it’s a very happy start to 2017 at Crystal House.”

For Lucille, who arrived in July 2014 straight from her family home, the move was ‘a big thing.’ Since her arrival she has attended Bromley College and Croydon College to study cookery, step-up to work, maths, English and daily living skills. She currently spends one day a week studying and two days doing work experience at a Shelter charity shop.

House-mate, Gavin, has been doing voluntary work at various charity shops locally. He was recently supported to get a certified copy of his birth certificate and obtain a passport, in the hopes of foreign travel at some point in the future.

In November, Rebecca, was delighted to receive an award from the Mayor of Croydon for her outstanding achievement in college during the past year. Rebecca came to the service in September and currently attends Croydon Adult Learning and Training College where her activities include rambling, creative computers, advanced cookery, dance, healthy living, and developing independence. With staff support she also attends a sporting activity organised by the Royal London Society for Blind People two Saturdays every month at Crystal Palace.

Rebecca said: “I feel really good living at Crystal House. The staff help me with my college work - they are very good to me and the other tenants. Our last holiday to Blackpool was great - my lovely keyworker and other support workers ensured we had the best of times.”

Joseph Osoba said: “We have a great team and feel privileged to support some wonderful people, so we’re keen to share news of their achievements with their community.”

To mark Crystal House’s third anniversary of operation in 2017, staff and service users are planning a house party in May, to which they will be inviting families, friends and social workers as well as people who live at other Regard services.

The seven bedroom property provides a home for people aged between 18 and 28.

There is currently one first floor en-suite room available at Crystal House, which is located close to local shops and amenities in Penge and has good transport links to places further afield.

Further information is available from Rod Brizzell on 07885 998 240 or visit the service page below.

Crystal House


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Specialism: Supported living service for young people with learning disabilities and/or autism in transition from residential college, foster care or the family

Llŷr, from Cerrig Cornel, celebrates new Co-Op post


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Llŷr Joyner, from Gwynedd in Mid Wales is celebrating landing his ‘dream job’ at a local supermarket.

Llŷr, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, was taken on as a volunteer by the Co-Op in Tywyn, and now works three shifts a week.

He lives at Cerrig Cornel care service in Llanegryn which provides support for people with learning disabilities, including autism, mental health, alcohol and substance misuse issues and acquired brain injuries.

Cerrig Cornel service manager Simon Moore said Llŷr was as ‘pleased as punch’ about his new job at the Old Station Yard store.

“Because of his Asperger’s Syndrome Llŷr doesn’t like change, so the whole process has been quite challenging, but I’m pleased to say he’s taking it all in his stride.

“Llŷr was measured up for his uniform and is delighted that he really looks the part. He is thrilled to be working as an active member of the community.

“He is very well liked at the Co-Op and they are all very proud of him, and he is also proud of his own recent achievements.”

Llŷr’s responsibilities include stocking shelves, fresh and frozen goods, collecting trolleys, ensuring baskets are in the right place, unpacking deliveries and taking them to the store room.

Added Simon: “Depending on how things go in the future, we hope he will eventually be able to help people with their bag-packing.”

In his spare time Llŷr loves to travel and enjoys all forms of transport. He regularly takes the train to see his family who live in Aberystwyth.

Cerrig Cornel is set up as a ‘younger adult’ service and employs the active model of support, ensuring each individual has access to outcome-based activities. Cerrig Cornel has an on-site activities co-ordinator, so each person will have an individual profile of activities and opportunities.

The service would be suitable for anyone coming through transition or moving on from residential care for the first time. The aim is to support individuals to achieve their goals; achieved by delivering a high quality service based on active support and outcome based activities.

For further information on Cerrig Cornel visit the service page below or call Julie Davies on 07885 998254.

Cerrig Cornel


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Specialism: The service is registered to provide support to people who have learning disabilities, including those with Autism/Asperger syndrome. The service can

Bright start to the new year for Anne Marie from Wrottesley Road


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Anne Marie, who has learning difficulties, moved into a Willesden residential home as an emergency placement just before Christmas 2015, she is looking forward to a New Year which sees her with better prospects than she’s ever had before, according to her social worker.

The team responsible for the turnaround in Anne Marie Cox’s life works at the Wrottesley Road service, where she lives with other people with learning disability and mental health needs.

Anne Marie’s social worker, Nuchjaree Fisher, said: “I am pleased to hear that Anne Marie has managed to achieve so much since she started her placement at Wrottesley Road. The staff are very supportive, proactive and creative, hence it shows in her progress.

“This is the most successful placement that Anne Marie has ever had. She is happier and more stable - the best I have seen since I started working with her.”

A key player in this success story is service manager Paul Emile, who Anne Marie refers to as her personal financial advisor because of the way he is helping her learn to budget and pay off her debts.

Paul said: “Understanding how to make informed financial choices is a really critical step in Anne Marie’s increasing independence, and she now understands how to stay solvent, which is a great break-through.”

“She is a very sociable person who enjoys every chance she gets to go out and about in the community, and wouldn’t dream of missing a session at any of her Mencap clubs, including regular keep fit sessions, conversation groups, church activities and volunteering.”

For the New Year Anne Marie is balancing the prospect of a hairdressing course against a jewellery-making course or a social care course, and is also hoping to be able to pursue art, drama or singing and music activities.

Paul Emile said: “We’re supporting her to explore the various options and choose the best one for her.

“The reason we achieve the results we do is because we believe in doing things with people, rather than ‘to’ them.

“Our aim is to support all the people who live with us to live their lives to the full and make the most of the opportunities available to them.

“In Anne Marie’s case, this includes being supported to make regular visits to Slough to meet up with her boyfriend and friends from the service where she lived previously, all of whom are still very important to her.”

People who live at Wrottesley Road are involved in all aspects of their support, from the recruitment of staff through to day-to-day matters. Staff appreciate how important this responsibility is to the people they support and how it reflects their desire to make a genuine contribution.

Wrottesley Road is a shared house which has space for six service users, with access to a lounge, kitchen/dining area and individual bedrooms.

There is currently one first floor front-facing room available in the six-bed house, which is located in a pleasant residential area of Willesden.

Paul Emile said: “Ours is a happy, warm, welcoming place to live, located in a good area with access to a great range of amenities, including the shops at Shepherds Bush’s Westfield centre, and close enough to the heart of London to allow us to take people there for day trips or mini-breaks.”

Further information is available from Paul Emile on 0208 838 3048 or visit the service page below.

Wrottesley Road


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Specialism: Learning Disability and/or Mental Health needs and behaviours that may challenge.

Type of Service: 24-hour supported living

The Regard Group welcomes a new Managing Director


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We are delighted to announced the appointment of Carole Edmond as the new managing director for The Regard Group,

Her arrival coincides with a period of significant growth at Regard. Having opened 13 new services over the past year, we have another three due to open during the first three months of 2017.

Regard’s CEO, Sandie Foxall-Smith, said: “We are delighted to have Carole join us at what is shaping up to be a very exciting time for Regard.

“Her experience will add breadth and depth to the business, not least in relation to the acquisition opportunities we continue to explore.”

Carole Edmond said: “I’m really impressed with the ethos, passion and purpose that Sandie and her team demonstrate for delivering high-quality services for adults with learning disabilities.

“The organisation has a great culture which is so important in a deeply people-based business.

“I’m very excited to become part of Regard’s senior team, and am looking forward to being part of an organisation which really lives its values and makes a difference every day.”

Carole comes to Regard after almost two decades in the childcare sector. After spearheading research for Bupa into the childcare market, Carole developed Bupa Childcare from a start-up position to become a top 10 operator within three years. After its spin off to Bright Horizons in 2009 she led Bright Horizons to become the leading nursery operator in the B2B and B2C markets in the U.K. and Ireland.

During her time with Bright Horizons, Carole’s focus on safety, quality and learning outcomes saw the business improve its regulatory performance and develop award-winning services, gaining sector recognition and increased customer satisfaction, and leading to several successful mergers and acquisitions.

Sandie Foxall-Smith said: “It is clear that during a time of significant growth at Bright Horizons, having Carole at the helm created a culture of inspiring leadership at all levels and high employee engagement.”

During this period the organisation was the first childcare company to be awarded the nationally recognised Education Investor Education Business of the Year in 2013, and it rose to seventh place on the ‘Great place to Work’ list in 2015.

Carole left Bright Horizons in 2015 to complete her doctoral studies. In the last year she has set up her own company working as an industry expert providing consultancy services to investors in the UK and internationally, as well as undertaking public speaking on the findings from her doctoral research on ‘female attainment’.

Regard is shortlisted for best employer support at the Skills for Care Awards


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The merits of our staff development programme have been recognised by inclusion in the 2017 ‘Accolades’ shortlist by Skills For Care, the strategic body for workforce development in adult social care in England and Wales.

As the UK’s fourth biggest private provider of supported living and residential services for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and acquired brain injuries; Regard are now through to the final three in the category of ‘Best Employer Support For Registered Managers.’

This award recognises organisations which can demonstrate their commitment to providing excellent support to their registered managers, and Regard earned its place in the shortlist by proving how the support it provides is effective, responsive and robust, and how it benefits other staff.

Regard CEO Sandie Foxall-Smith said: “We also had to provide evidence of how we champion the role of the registered manager and show a commitment to the provision of on-going support.

“We are delighted to receive such public recognition because we strongly believe in ‘growing our own’ when it comes to registered managers.

“While we do sometimes recruit in managers for our services, we have a well-established, proven career path with lots of in-house support which enables people to work their way up the ladder from front-line staff to senior management.

“Our development programme really works, and it’s very gratifying to receive this endorsement from such a well-respected source.”

The Regard Group provides a three-tiered management development programme supporting front-line staff to develop their careers from its ‘Aspirational Leaders’ course, aimed at junior management, to ‘Managing People at Work’ and ‘Inspirational Leaders’ for senior management.

These programmes combine face-to-face training with self-directed study. Delegates develop confidence and self-awareness in managing a team, knowledge and skills in motivating and supporting people at work, and a deeper understanding of their role and responsibilities, and are endorsed by the Regard’s board of directors, members of which assess delegates’ final business presentations.

Regard is also committed to providing Positive Behaviour Training in the form of PROACT-SCIPr-UK training for staff with the support of a sizable Positive Behaviour Support team. The effectiveness of one of Regard’s trainers was recognised last year with a Gold Award in the ‘Care Trainer’ category of the Great British Care Awards.

Skills for Care, whose remit is to create a better-led, more skilled and valued adult social care workforce in England and Wales, has been running its annual Accolades scheme since 2003. The awards seek to recognise the achievements of organisations committed to boosting the skills and knowledge of the growing adult social care workforce.

The organisers say the 2017 Accolades finalists shortlist is ‘an eclectic mix’ of employers, training providers, local authorities and individual employers who have all demonstrated an innovative approach to developing learning and development opportunities for the 1.5m strong adult social care workforce in England.

Skills for Care CEO Sharon Allen said: “Adult social care needs to be much more confident about celebrating the excellence in service provision that happens day in and night out. All the Accolades finalists are outstanding examples of how we can make sure highly motivated care and support workers can develop their skills and knowledge which leads to high quality care and support for people in our communities.

“It is also a chance in the continuing tough financial environment for us to share knowledge of how we can find, retain and train people with the right values to meet increasing demand for care and support so everyone who needs it can access truly person centred care.”

The awards ceremony will take place in Birmingham on Thursday 10th March 2017.

The Regard Awards – Celebrating Excellent Support - Winners for this quarter


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Congratulations to the following team and individuals who have won this quarter’s internal awards. They will receive a framed certificate, pin badge and a £50 voucher (£100 for teams).

Outstanding Team

Winners: The Pipwell Manor Team, East Region

The Pipwell Manor team were nominated by Viv Collin who said, “Pipwell Manor is the Phoenix in Regard. It has only been open since February 2015 but the team have overcome many challenges. This is entirely due to the hard work and dedication of Ashley and his team of staff. Today Pipwell has ‘green’ audits and a strong team who have the determination to succeed. The staff work tirelessly to cover shifts themselves to keep consistency for the people we support. They actively engage with the individuals and bring laughter into the house.”

Shortlisted:

Crescent Road - Wales and North West

Cerrig Cornel - Wales and North West

Operations Team (Evette Townley and Lindsey Cooke) - Wales and North West

Kingston Office - Kingston

Rhyme House - Kent and East Sussex

Whitehatch - London, Surrey & Hampshire


Continuous Improvement

Winner: Sheila Lawrence, Support Worker, Whitehatch; London, Surrey and Hampshire

Sheila was nominated by Jane Burse who said, “Sheila started with Regard in January 2016. She has gone from strength to strength over recent months and has embraced the ‘shift leading’ role, working hard to ensure a shift runs smoothly. Sheila is passionate about healthy eating and has used her experience of working in a school kitchen to produce recipes using fresh ingredients and “cooking from scratch”. The individuals we support are really enjoying the new menu ideas which support their weight management and well-being. Sheila has a positive attitude and is really working hard in her role. She loves to learn and is willing to try new things.”

Shortlisted:

The Homeleigh Team - Wales and North West

Living Our Values

Winner: Trevor Wilcox, Service Manager, Cloverdale, Kent and East Sussex

Theresa Cook nominated Trevor, saying “In October I arranged to meet with Sue, from Chailey Heritage Foundation and a young man that she wanted to find support for. The visit was the first visit for the young man to any provider. When he arrived he was very nervous but Trevor got down onto his knees on the young man’s level. He found out what he liked and bantered with him on his level. To see this young man using his communication aides as well as laughing and relaxing by the end of his visit was amazing. Most of all to see the smile on the young man’s face and hearing the feedback from Sue after the visit made me so proud to be part of a company that really cares. “

Shortlisted:

Heather Jupp - Livingstone Road Kent and East Sussex

The Tolworth Team - London, Surrey and Hampshire

Pipwell Manor


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Specialism: Transitional age 18+ supported living service for young adults with learning disabilities and/or autism moving from residential college, foster care or the

Whitehatch


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Specialism Adults with learning disability, some of whom may have additional conditions, for example, autism, complex epilepsy or mobility issues. Some present challenging

Cloverdale House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

The sky’s the limit for helicopter fan James


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A young man with learning disabilities from Worthing has fulfilled the dream of a lifetime and taken to the skies on board a helicopter.

James, who is on the autistic spectrum, and who has a passion for all things aeronautical, made the pleasure flight from Goodwood airfield.

Coneyhurst Lodge, where James currently resides, is a residential service in St Lawrence Avenue, he was accompanied by his key worker Aimée.

The pair enjoyed a thrilling 30-minute flight along the Hampshire and West Sussex coastline on board the G-Sunn helicopter.

“James really loves aeroplanes and helicopters and was delighted when he got the chance for a flight from Goodwood,” said Aimée.

“It was a big thing for him but he coped brilliantly and took the whole thing in his stride.

“He was a little apprehensive to begin with but once we were airborne and looking down over the sea and the countryside below he was entranced.”

James has lived at Coneyhurst Lodge since he was 18 and attends Chichester College.

His mum Jane, a Skills for Life manager at Bexhill College, said she was delighted her son was able to have the experience.

She said: “He looked a bit scared at one or two points but when he came back he was so proud at what he had managed to achieve.

“He couldn’t have done it without Aimée. She talked him through the whole thing and was there with him throughout the flight for support.

“James has always loved flying and has been to places like Spain, Portugal and Tenerife on a plane, but this was the first time he’s been on a helicopter.”

Coneyhurst Lodge is a 10-bed service that cares for adults with autism, health and physical health needs such as epilepsy.

The Coneyhurst Lodge staff team focus on promoting independence, opportunities and empowerment within a safe structured environment.

The service currently has a vacancy for a first floor en-suite room with lift access and is wheelchair accessible and another due on the ground floor.

For families interested in knowing more, details are available from Theresa Cook on 07812 072043 or the service page below.

Coneyhurst Lodge


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Specialism: Adults with complex health needs including epilepsy, physical mobility needs & other associated complexities.

Details of Vacancies: One ground floor

Two decades of caring at Kneller Road


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Our Kneller Road residential service in Twickenham, which supports adults with learning disabilities and mental health issues, has just celebrated its 20th anniversary by holding a party for the people who live there, as well as staff, family members and friends from neighbouring services.

Guests of honour were deputy manager Bruno Verdosci, and two of the people who live at the service - all three of whom have been at Kneller Road, since it opened in 1996.

Bruno said: “I have stayed working here all that time because I love my job. Knowing that you are making a positive difference in people’s lives makes this job so rewarding, and Kneller Road has always been a well-run service and a great place to work.”

Previously Bruno had worked at the old Normansfield Hospital, transferring to Kneller Road when Normansfield closed.

Service manager, Andrea Cully, said: “Bruno is a highly valued member of our team. He has such a lovely way with him when supporting the people who live with us and they love him.”

Kneller Road is a small residential service, currently long-term home to five individuals with complex needs and high levels of vulnerability.

Andrea Cully said: “Although the people who live with us are all non-verbal, we can tell from their behaviour that they are relaxed and enjoy the stability provided by our staff team.

“A lot of things have changed in the care sector over the past two decades – mainly in respect of regulation and accountability, which is all to the good.

“Regard was founded in 1994 and now cares for more than 1,100 people, with a dedicated staff of over 2,100 people working at 147 locations throughout the UK, so we’ve seen a great many changes.

“We’re recognised as innovators in the care sector, having pioneered some notable improvements such as Regard’s Personal Daily Organisers – now in operation in our services nationwide – which enable us to respond to people’s changing needs and provide crucial evidence to our funding bodies.”

An example of the way Regard caters for the changing needs of its service users can be seen in Kneller Road’s response to the increasingly complicated care requirements of one of the people who live there.

Andrea Cully explains: “Foundations are now in for a new property which is being built at the rear of Kneller Road in response to the changing health needs of one of our service users.

“The new accommodation will mean they will be able to remain living at the service which has been their stable home for as long as possible.”

This reorganisation will result in a vacancy at the service early in the New Year, details of which are available from Andrea on 0208 898 5431 or see the service page below.

It will also mean that there are new employment opportunities available for support workers at the service, both full-time and part-time.

Andrea Cully said she’d be interested to hear from people who have the desire to really make a difference to the lives of others.

Andrea said: “You couldn’t describe what we do as ‘easy’ but it can be incredibly rewarding. Care offers interesting and challenging opportunities, and attracts people from a variety of backgrounds. The most important characteristic of a good carer is having genuine passion for what they do.”

Kneller Road


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Kneller Road supports adults with a learning disabilities, autism and individual complex needs.

Details of vacancy: Purpose built individual self-contained MyHome

Our Kent services got together for a cracker of a Christmas party


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A Christmas party for a group of local people with learning difficulties and mental health problems went with a real swing at Teynham Village Hall near Sittingbourne in Kent yesterday.

The festive get-together was arranged by the team at Berkeley House, a Regard residential home, and was attended by over 115 service users, staff, neighbours, family, and friends from eight of Regard’s nearby services, who enjoyed a Christmas disco with lots of their favourite seasonal songs and a festive buffet. Some of the highlights were a visit from Santa, who came bearing gifts, and the judging of a ‘design-and-make-your-own’ cracker competition, which everyone involved really enjoyed.

Alison Fraser, service manager for Berkeley House said: “Among our guests were some non-verbal individuals, who raised their thumbs and smiled to show how much they were enjoying themselves, while others - including some physically disabled people – told us what a great party they thought it was.

“We put a lot of effort into organising an event that everyone would enjoy, and my team and I were delighted that everyone had such a good time.”

Service users at the party came from Regard services located in Lynsted, Hythe, Sittingbourne, Herne Bay, Chilham, Bobbing and Rochester.

For families interested in knowing more, details are available from Theresa Cook on 07812 072043 or on the service page below.

Berkeley House


Berkeley_Hs_-_Granary_Lounge_2

We are holding an event in July for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Bradwell House


Bradwell_bedroom

Specialism: Adults with a learning disability, and accompanying diagnosis such as epilepsy, visual impairment and behavioural and emotional difficulties.

Details of

Rhyme House


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Transitional Service

Specialism: Learning disability, autism and behaviours that may challenge.

Details of Vacancy: Large first floor room with

Seymour House


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Specialism: Autism, learning disabilities and/or associated mental health needs

Details of Vacancy: None

Type of Service: Residential

Ashford Lodge


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Specialism: Adults with learning disabilities who may also have complex needs and behaviours that are challenging.

Type of Service: 24 hour supported

Blue Cottage


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Specialism: Supported living service for young people with learning disabilities and or autism in transition from residential college, foster care or the family

Byfield Court


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Specialism: Adults with Learning Disabilities and Autism. Communication strategies are key to the success at this service.

Details of Vacancies: No

Rochester House


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Specialism Learning: Disability, autism and complex health and physical needs.

Type of Service: The environment has full accessibility to people using

OWL Town Farm Workshop celebrate employment success for Andrew


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A man with learning difficulties has been celebrating the achievement of a personal milestone with family and friends at a specialist training centre in the Dorset village of Sixpenny Handley.

Not only has Andrew Michael-Phillips earned the National Open College Network (NOCN) entry level 3 certificate in ‘Gaining Craft Skills for Employment,’ he has so impressed his new employers at the village’s Crossroads Café that they decided to fund a presentation evening as a ‘thank you’ for his dedication.

Andrew, is one of seven people with learning disabilities or mental health needs who have gained an NOCN certificate this year, thanks to skills developed at Town Farm Workshop, an Outcomes With Learning (OWL) centre run by The Regard Group.

Service manager, Helen Ritson, said: “Andrew joined us at Town Farm Workshop in 2012, taking part in pottery and weaving as well as going swimming and to the gym, and his is a real success story.

“After several months’ attendance he had gained a huge amount of confidence and developed friendships, so he decided to make the move from his parents’ home to a supported living flat in Cranborne, also run by The Regard Group.

“With support he has continued to experiment with new activities at the workshop and has also been involved in exhibitions and events, including Bovington Arts and Craft and Larmer Tree Festival.”

During 2015 Andrew enrolled on the NOCN course and was supported by TFW tutors to complete units such as career preparation, setting goals for personal development, customer service skills, and health and safety procedures.

Having successfully completed his qualification in early 2016, Andrew was then supported to secure a work experience placement at the Crossroads Café in Sixpenny Handley.

David, the café organiser said: “This work placement has been a great success. Andrew makes a determined effort to always be on time and works really hard.

“We consider him a great asset at the café, and we’re thrilled that his work with us has contributed to the widening of his social circle, and helped further develop his skills and confidence.”

Visitors to the Crossroads Café make donations to help cover its running costs, with any excess being donated to charity.

David said: “We decided it would be nice to donate to Town Farm Workshops as a kind of ‘thank you’ to Andrew for all his efforts.

“Since a special event was being planned at which NOCN certificates were to be presented to all the successful candidates, including Andrew, we decided the donation from the café would be well spent on covering the cost of this grand affair.”

Over 70 family and friends came along to the presentation evening to help celebrate the achievement of Andrew and his six peers.

Andrew said: “We had a great time together. Thank you to my tutors at Town Farm Workshop and to David for his support.”

For more details or to book an OWL day session please visit the OWL page below.

OWL Town Farm Workshop


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

The Regard Group announces a partnership with the IABA


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The Regard Group recently sponsored a series of 4-day training workshops which were hosted by the Institute for Applied Behaviour Analysis (IABA).

We have established a mutually beneficial training partnership arrangement with the IABA who are a US-based organisation, prominent internationally for their work in specialist behaviour support for individuals with intellectual (learning) and developmental disabilities.

The training was attended by an assortment of social care professionals from, NHS psychologists, learning disability nurses, group home managers, behaviour specialists, senior managers from a number of care providers, commissioners, and family carers.

Also attending from the Regard Group was three of the senior regional directors, along with a number of area managers and several service mangers/team leaders as part of Regard’s continuing professional development management programme. The purpose of the training partnership with the IABA and workshop series is used to consider adaptations and enhancements in the care planning processes and specialist behavioural management support provided by Regard which maximise quality of life outcomes for the people we support.

The IABA is headed up by Gary La Vigna who is renowned in the social care field for his work in behaviour management. Gary is recognised by carers, social care managers, academics, allied health professionals. policy makers and commissioners for his pivotal research and work in service design, organisational management systems within social care field of learning disability care provision (such as the model of the periodic service review) and his work in behavioural programming which formed the foundations for specialist behaviour analysis and clinical support used currently within the social acre field to manage behaviours which may challenge.

Regards Head of Behaviour Support, James Kiamtia-Cooper said “this is one of the most inspiring and thought provoking training series I have attended and can only serve to enhance the way we work”.

Staff help make a special birthday for David


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A residential care and support service near Ringwood in Dorset, has helped a man in the final days of his life to enjoy a special 50th birthday with friends and family.

Staff at Northfields House in Poulner organised a party for David shortly before he died in July at the property where he had lived since 2011.

David, who had a learning disability, was diagnosed with dementia in 2014 which affected his intellectual functioning and mobility.

Karen, Service Manager at Northfields, said her team were determined to ensure David could enjoy the celebrations.

“We had planned on having a big 50th birthday bash for David but he became very poorly in the last few months of his life.

“He went from being very mobile, to needing a walking frame and wheelchair, to finally deteriorating to the point where he was confined to his bed.

“It was agreed that a temporary bedroom would be made for him that was completed just in time for his big day.

“To ensure he could still celebrate and be involved in his birthday, the team needed to support him to be able to go downstairs from his bedroom on the first floor.”

The people from whom David’s bed was hired took it apart and moved it downstairs so he could be comfortable in his new bedroom, and the service organised for a private ambulance team to carry David from his bed and take him downstairs to his party.

Karen worked with support staff to make party food, including a birthday cake, and hung up balloons and personalised bunting around Northfields.

To make the celebration more personal, Karen and senior support worker Becca Leonard, helped David take a trip down memory lane.

Karen added: “We found and printed many pictures of David with life-long memories, activities and people he had met over the years. We put them up on the wall next to his bed to create a visual memory wall.

“During the party we played his favourite Abba CD and he giggled and smiled all the way through. It was a memory everyone will remember and treasure forever.

“The party was enjoyed by all of David’s family, friends and staff old and new who helped him celebrate his birthday.

“I am so proud of the team at Northfields and our sister service at Two Wells. Everyone pulled together to help a very special man who touched everyone’s heart.

“David was a truly amazing person and we would have gone to the moon and back to make him happy. Our thoughts and prayers are now with his family.”

As a result of the caring and co-ordinated support they demonstrated working with David, the team at Northfields House was named by Regard’s as their ‘Outstanding Team’ in the care-provider’s latest ‘Celebrating Excellent Support’ in-house awards scheme.

Families wishing to know more about the residential facilities and support offered at Northfields can find out more from Helen Petitdemange on 07944 105 428 or visit the service page below.

Northfields House


Northfields_-_Front_of_House

Specialism: Adults with a learning disability. At Northfields we work with people who have complex needs and a high level of vulnerability including

Caring Andy, from Cerrig Camu, ‘has the X Factor’


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A man who decided to switch to a career in caring after visiting a Dolgellau residential home to do some building work and eventually rising to become its manager, has won a top award at the 2016 Wales Care Awards.

Andrew Papirynk visited Cerrig Camu in Dolgellau in the winter of 2004 to carry out some labouring work for the firm he was with at the time.

He quickly struck up a rapport with some of its residents and immediately opted to make caring his profession.

Nine years later Andy was appointed as Cerrig Camu’s registered manager and has been commended for the way he runs the service, and credited for helping integrate clients with learning disabilities and mental health needs into the community.

It is this dedicated approach to his caring role that landed Andy, 30, the Gold Award for ‘Excellence in Learning Disability and Mental Health’ in the annual Wales Care Awards.

Originally from Barmouth, after finishing school at Ysgol Ardudwy in Harlech, Andy went straight into the building trade.

He said: “I’d been working as a labourer for a couple of years when I went to Cerrig Camu to do some building work there.

“At that stage I didn’t know what I wanted to do in life, but when I started to talk with some of the service users and managed to build up a rapport with them I felt that caring was a career I could go into.

“Not long afterwards I started at Cerrig Camu as a support worker and then gradually worked my way up through the ranks, going from team leader and support manager until I became service manager in June 2013.”

Mario Kreft MBE, Chairman of Care Forum Wales, said: “The aim of the Wales Care Awards is to recognise the unstinting and often remarkable dedication of our unsung heroes and heroines across Wales.

“The care sector is full of wonderful people because it’s not just a job it’s a vocation – these are the people who really do have the X Factor.

“If you don’t recognise the people who do the caring you will never provide the standards that people need and never recognise the value of the people who need the care in society.

“We need to do all we can to raise the profile of the care sector workforce - they deserve to be lauded and applauded.”

Cerrig Camu is run by Regard, the UK’s fourth largest private organisation which provides supported living and residential services for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and acquired brain injury.

Regard is one of just four of the 17,000 care organisations in the country to have achieved the Gold Standard from Investors in People which – to quote the head of the accrediting body – acknowledges Regard’s “great people management practice, and commitment to being the very best it can be.”

There are currently four rooms available in the recently refurbished 14-bed manor house which is at the heart of Cerrig Camu. The building is divided into three separate services, each self-contained on its own separate floor, with shared living rooms and a kitchen diner on each floor where people can come together to socialise.

Two of the available rooms are wheelchair-accessible en-suite rooms on the first floor, sharing facilities with three other individuals; one is a second-floor en-suite room, sharing facilities with two other people, and the fourth vacancy is a ground-floor self-contained flat. All care packages are person-centred and tailored to the needs of the individual. Further details about the service can be found via the service page below.

Cerrig Camu Residential Service


Cerrig_Camu_Main_House

We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

OWL Cerrig Camu


cerrig_camu_owl_service_user

To book a day at an OWL service online please click here: BOOK ONLINE

An innovative project has been set up

Caring Gwenda, from Beudygwyn Farm, wins an award at the Wales Care Awards


Gwenda-Wales-Care-Awards-for-web

An imaginative approach to care has enabled local woman, Gwenda, to see off competition from across Wales to secure a bronze award in the category of ‘Leadership and Management in Residential or Nursing Care,’ in the 2016 Wales Care Awards.

Farmer’s daughter Gwenda Potter was brought up next door to Beudygwyn Farm at Carreglefn, near Amlwch, where she now works, and recalls the residents visiting her home.

That inspired her to go into the care profession six years ago and to involve the 12 residents of Beudygwyn Farm in the day-to-day work on the farm.

The people who live there all have learning disabilities, mental health problems or acquired brain injuries and Gwenda said: “Many of them are heavily involved in the work on the farm, one of them cuts the grass and they share the chores.

“It’s a small working farm and having them involved in looking after the sheep and chickens, growing vegetables and collecting eggs is good for them, gives them purpose and new skills, and the knowledge of where the food comes from and how it’s produced.”

The eight-acre smallholding can accommodate up to 14 people and Gwenda, who has a partner and three children, still lives next door and is Welsh-speaking which is often useful as most of the residents are from North Wales.

Other family members had worked at Beudygwyn and Gwenda started there in 2010 as a support worker and trained to become a senior social worker and then deputy manager before taking over.

”I love the job,” she said: “The farm is very rural but it’s only five minutes to the shops and it’s very relaxing and therapeutic.

“It’s very good for the residents to get used to looking after their own environment, to maintain their own home by doing little jobs, and the eggs and vegetables produced here are used in the meals they have.

“I wouldn’t change my job at all. As a farmer’s daughter I’ve got the best of both worlds because I’m on a farm and I enjoy a job where little things can mean so much, like teaching a man to fasten his shoelaces for the first time.”

Gwenda holds regular meetings and training sessions for the residents which gives them a voice in their care and allows them to gain knowledge of their own diagnosis.

Mario Kreft MBE, Chairman of Care Forum Wales, said: “The aim of the Wales Care Awards is to recognise the unstinting and often remarkable dedication of our unsung heroes and heroines across Wales.

“The care sector is full of wonderful people because it’s not just a job it’s a vocation – these are the people who really do have the X Factor.

“If you don’t recognise the people who do the caring you will never provide the standards that people need and never recognise the value of the people who need the care in society.

“We need to do all we can to raise the profile of the care sector workforce - they deserve to be lauded and applauded.”

Beudygwyn Farm is a residential service for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and autism. Further details about the service can be found via the service page below.

Beudygwyn Farm


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

A dream job for Crystal Palace fan, Graham


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A Crystal Palace fan, who has a mild learning disability and is being supported to live in the community, is celebrating landing his dream job as a steward at the club’s stadium at Selhurst Park.

Graham, who lives in Gipsy Hill, began his career with ‘the ‘Eagles’ working outside the sports ground and was recently promoted to work inside the stadium helping ensure a safe environment for visitors on match days.

Graham lives independently in the community in his own flat, receives 20 hours of support a week from the South Road supported living service in Forest Hill to help manage his finances and shopping.

Said South Road team leader Folahan Adebowale: “We are delighted for Graham. As a Crystal Palace fan this is a dream come true. He loves being part of the action on match days and helping making sure everything runs smoothly.

“We supported Graham to go for the job and fill in the relevant paperwork because we knew he could do it and that he has a lot to give. He enjoys working with the public and the chance to shine as an ambassador for the club.”

Graham lived at the South Road service for three years before being supported to make the move to live independently since 2012. In preparation for this staff worked with Graham on how to manage his finances, including drawing up a weekly budget and putting away savings each week.

Added Folahan: “Moving out to live on your own can be a huge step and Graham is managing very well and enjoying have the freedom to organise his own affairs and live his own life.”

South Road is a male-only service for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs, autism, and complex epilepsy. The service has a large garden and the added benefit of being located close to local shops, amenities and with good transport links.

The house is split over three floors, with seven single bedrooms including a bedsit on the top floor, and currently has a vacancy in one of its ground floor rooms.

The South Road staff team focus on promoting independence, supporting the people who live at the service to find employment opportunities and developing person-centred transition plans for independent living. Packages of outreach support are available for those able to move on, like Graham, which ensures continuity of support.

Families interested in further details should contact Rod Brizzell on 07885 998240 visit the South Road webpage below.

South Road


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Specialism: Learning Disability and/or Mental Health needs, Autistic, Complex Epilepsy and behaviour that may challenge.

Male only 24-hour

Mary Poppins comes to Homeleigh


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The TV show ‘Four In A Bed’ which has B&B owners from around the country competing to be named ‘best value for money’ has inspired the manager of a Manchester service to engage her staff in a fun new way of delivering quality care.

Emma, who manages Manchester-based Homeleigh, a 30-bed residential service for people with learning difficulties and mental health issues, has already earned recognition from her industry by being shortlisted for ‘Special Needs Manager’ in this year’s National Care Awards.

Now Emma has introduced an element of fun into her staff’s routine by launching Homeleigh’s own version of the TV competition.

Emma said: “We have a responsible job to do, caring for a great bunch of people with very special needs, but that doesn’t mean we can’t embrace the lighter side of life.

“I’d just been watching the show, when my friend walked into the room singing the Mary Poppins song that goes ‘You find the fun and snap! The job’s a game,’ and I thought – yes, we could do that!”

The game Emma developed mirrors ‘Four In A Bed’s’ concept of asking people to inject a little fun competition into their work by rating each other on the standard of the service they deliver.

At the start of their shift on ‘game days’ members of the team are given a simple questionnaire with a colleague’s name on, to indicate who they will be judging. The forms are returned at the end of the day with a score of 1-10 on questions such as: how pleasant was this person towards residents? how clean were their rooms? did they go the extra mile? would you be happy if that person supported your loved one?

Questionnaires are handed in at the end of the day and reviewed by the shift senior, with feedback given to each participant and the overall winner receiving a prize such as flowers or chocolates.

Emma said: “Feedback from my team has been overwhelmingly positive, and they say they find it a real morale-booster.

“The game encourages staff to reflect on their own working practice, and helps managers see where improvements can be made or further training is required, enabling them to identify strengths and weaknesses on the team.

“It also gives them an insight into how staff perform when they are at their most productive, which gives them a realistic level of expectation for each team member.

“On top of that, the people who live with us are on the receiving end of a team who are really giving it their all.

“I’d say this means everybody wins, but Simon Daulby (pictured above)- one of our support workers – has won the game twice, so he’s a super-winner!”

Emma Jarrett and her team at Homeleigh support the individuals who live there to undertake activities which make them happy and meet their needs to be involved within the community and their home, such as promoting college attendance, full involvement in their daily activities and in the community, organising outings, and meeting individuals’ wishes and preferences.

There will be openings for new support staff at Homeleigh in the near future so Emma would be pleased to hear from people who have the desire to really make a difference to the lives of others, whatever their background. Emma can be contacted on 01617 407 313 or at homeleigh@regard.co.uk. Further information about Homeleigh is available via the service page below.

Homeleigh


Homeleigh

We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Rise in involvement for people with learning disability issues


Rise-Logo-for-Website Regard-CEO%2C-Sandie-Foxall-Smith_2---Web

A new twist has been given to the campaign for person-centred care launched earlier this year by The Regard Group.

Following on from Regard’s push for improved focus on service users being at the centre of their own care, the organisation is now calling for learning disability and mental health care provision to be not just person-centred but person-led.

Sandie Foxall-Smith, CEO of Regard, said: “Our ambition is to empower those we support to be fully involved not just in their own care but in the bigger decisions that affect the homes where they live.

“We believe in giving them a voice to help us make decisions, even when there are communications difficulties. This approach builds the self-esteem of the people we support and helps them become more independent.

“The staff teams based in Regard’s 147 services across the country appreciate how important this responsibility is to the people they support, and how it reflects their desire to make a genuine contribution.”

The organisation’s new initiative is now being rolled out nationwide, in the wake of a successful year-long pilot project in London and Surrey.

Individuals supported by Regard will be asked whether they would like to become more actively involved in decisions about their support, and how it is delivered. They have also been invited to feed into the broader aims of the organisation, and increase their involvement in issues such as the internal and external auditing and inspection of services.

Sandie Foxall-Smith said: “We’ve also asked them how they would like to extend their involvement among the community they live in and – because we’re doing everything we can to encourage full participation – we’re asking them to tell us how they want this campaign to work. It’s the people who live with us who get to decide what they want from the campaign, where and when they want campaign progress meetings, and who should be involved in those meetings.

“They’ve called the project RISE@Regard, with RISE standing for respect, independence, speech/being heard and equality, which is what our service users have said are most important to them.”

Groups involved in the pilot project have drawn up a charter featuring six elements they would like staff teams, managers and the people they support to sign up to, which has been signed off by Regard’s senior management.

Sandie Foxall-Smith said: “The charter addresses eminently reasonable aims: for the individuals we support to be at the centre of their own care planning and any decisions made about their lives, to be supported to live their lives as independently as possible and to have increased involvement in their communities.

“The charter also makes it clear that they would like to have an active part in audits and inspections which take place in their homes, that they wish to be involved in staff recruitment, and that they want to know about the ‘big decisions’ The Regard Group makes about their homes and their care.

“We’re not just dealing with immediate goals and outcomes here, we’re looking ahead over the next couple of decades. Our work involves supporting some of the most vulnerable people in society and it is vital that they should be able to tell us whether we are getting it right or not.

“There are likely to be times that we shall be asked awkward questions, but the individuals we support have a right both to ask questions and to expect honest replies, and outsiders such as commissioning bodies are endorsing our initiative and giving us great feedback on the RISE campaign.

“It’s now our responsibility to take the project forward, and I’m delighted to say that all the regional teams in Regard are signing up to the new charter with enthusiasm, as well as developing local RISE groups.”

We are excited to have four finalists at the National Care Awards 2016


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Our staff are getting their posh frocks and suits out for a gala awards evening in London on 25 November, with four of the organisation’s nominees shortlisted in various categories.

The Regard Group itself is up for the award of ‘Care Home Group’ of the year, having satisfied judges that the organisation delivers ‘exceptional client care combined with excellent staff development and impressive financial results.’

CEO Sandie Foxall-Smith, who has already been named as Investors in People’s ‘Leader of the Year’ for 2016, is up for the title of ‘Care Personality,’ and two of Regard’s service managers, Emma Jarrett who runs Homeleigh in Manchester and Heather Jupp who leads the Livingstone Road service in Gillingham, Kent, go head-to-head for the 2016 Special Needs Manager award.

Sandie Foxall-Smith said: “It is very gratifying when the hard work we all put in receives objective recognition like this from fellow care industry professionals.

“We already feel like winners just by being included in so many shortlists, but obviously we’ve all got our fingers crossed that we might hear our names called out when the results are announced at the awards evening.”

The aim of the National Care Awards is to celebrate the very best people in the long-term sector, highlighting excellence and rewarding those who work tirelessly to provide consistently outstanding care.

Regard cares for more than 1,100 people, with a dedicated staff of over 2,100 people working at 147 locations throughout the UK.

Testimonials submitted in support of the nominations included a quote from the inspector whose report resulted in Regard receiving ‘Gold’ status from Investors In People: “Your employees are highly motivated and are fully embracing the person-centred approach, which is the foundation of their work. It is rare that I find a cohort of staff so committed to improving the life of those in their care.”

For more information about the awards please click here.

Livingstone Road


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Specialism: Supported Living Service in Gillingham, Kent supporting adults with a traumatic or non-traumatic Acquired Brain Injury and varying degrees of cognitive, physical,

Homeleigh


Homeleigh

We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Caring Kay’s Christmas shoe box quest


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It may only be October but Kay who lives at one of our services in Plymouth is already thinking what she can do help people who are living on the streets this Christmas.

Kay, who lives at Victoria and Grenville, is collecting for the South West’s Homeless Shoebox Appeal for the South West.

Kay, her fellow housemates and the staff team who support them will be collecting items including toiletries, hats and scarves, torches and sweets that will be handed out on Christmas Day.

Said Victoria service manager Donna: “Kay really loves getting involved and is looking forward to bringing a bit of Christmas cheer to people who are having a tough time.

“It may seem only a small thing but these little parcels really do make a difference to people who may feel excluded from the festive celebrations.

“Over the next few weeks Kay and the team at Victoria and Grenville will be asking local shop owners if they are willing to donate items to the cause.

“Christmas is all about giving and everyone deserves a gesture of love even if it’s something small.”

Kay, who has a learning disability, is one of nine people who live at Victoria and Grenville, in two terraced houses close to Plymouth city centre.

The registered service provides support to adults who are vulnerable and have a learning disability, mental health issues, challenging behaviour and Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Donna said: “One of the reasons we support the people who live with us to help others in this way is because such activities provide them with mental stimulation, a sense of purpose and develop their social skills.

“It’s also a great way for them to connect to their community and make new friends, and it makes them feel valued because they’re making a contribution, which is good for their self-confidence and provides a natural sense of accomplishment.”

“It’s typical of the sort of person-centred support we provide at Victoria and Grenville, which is all about focusing on supporting individuals to live life to the full by doing things with people, rather than ‘to’ them.”

There is currently a vacancy at Victoria House with an upper floor room available. For further information contact Donna on 01752 661171 or visit the service page below.

Victoria and Grenville


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Specialism: This service is specifically dedicated to providing support to adults who are vulnerable and have a learning disability, Mental Health Issues, Challenging

Encouraging engagement with local communities through charity work


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By Sandie Foxall-Smith, CEO of The Regard Group

Studies measuring hormones and brain activity have revealed that being helpful delivers immense pleasure - we are hard-wired to give to others and the more we give, the happier we feel. It’s not just a question of instant gratification, helping others through charity work or fundraising provides mental stimulation and a sense of purpose. Also, very importantly, it allows you to connect to your community, make new friends, and develop your social skills.

Recognising that the social contact aspect of helping and working with others can have a profound effect on our overall psychological well-being, the question for Regard has never been whether we should support our service users’ involvement in charity fundraising and voluntary work, rather how can we ensure everyone we support has ample opportunity for suitable involvement?

Claire Searle, who lives in a supported living property in Gayton, Norfolk, is one of the many people we support who enjoy working in a local charity shop.

The Sail House team helped Claire - who has learning difficulties - to identify a suitable position and she has now been working happily at the British Heart Foundation shop in King’s Lynn High Street for more than three years.

She travels to King’s Lynn independently and we get fantastic feedback about her. Claire’s contribution is clearly highly valued and she’s been presented with a ‘Long Service’ certificate, which means a great deal to her.

Such opportunities are invaluable to the people we support - it gives them a platform for integration, makes them feel valued because they’re making a contribution, increases their self-confidence and provides a natural sense of accomplishment. Even those who are not capable of undertaking voluntary work in the community are supported to participate in regular charity fundraising, with our staff and service users voting annually for a charity they wish to support. Regard matches every pound raised by the staff and service users with a pound from the corporate coffers.

The chosen national charity for 2016 is MIND, and fundraising events are being undertaken regionally all year long, with activities such as sponsored or fundraising barbecues, picnics, walks/runs, muddy obstacle courses, bake-offs, tombolas, charity days and auctions.

At Arrowe Hall in the Wirral, service and locality managers entered fully into the spirit of the service’s charity summer barbecue subjecting themselves to an onslaught of wet sponges in the stocks. The feel-good day raised nearly £670 for MIND, and strengthened relationships with local businesses and individuals who kindly donated raffle prizes.

And in Snowdonia, when our OWL project at Cerrig Camu and Llwyngwian Farm held a joint fundraiser for MIND, service users were fully involved in all the organisation, planning, and preparations, helping design and make water stocks, bookmarks and trinket boxes to sell - not forgetting all the lovely cakes for the cake stall.

Suzanne, who attends day sessions at Cerrig Camu said: “I had a great time; I enjoyed having the tombola. My family came up too and it was nice to introduce my friends to them.”

Terry, who lives at Llwyngwian Farm said: “It was nice to meet up with my friends and the homemade cakes were lovely. My favourite part of the day was getting my care worker soaking wet in the stocks.”

Endorsement for such efforts was received recently from the CQC inspector who gave an ‘Outstanding’ rating to our Douglas House service in Plymouth - the rating being due in part to the brilliant way our service users integrate with the local community while fundraising for the city’s St Luke’s Hospice. Our resolve to keep on helping others just got stronger.

Article first published in the Care Talk magazine August 2016 - www.caretalk.co.uk

Arrowe Hall


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Specialism: Arrowe Hall is a beautiful stately home set in its own grounds within a large municipal park and golf course. The tenants

Horseshoes under the hammer at Harbour


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A man with learning difficulties has succeeded in transforming abandoned horse-shoes into an innovative flower-pot holder thanks to new skills learned at weekly metal-work classes in Totnes.

Ben is one of the individuals we support at Harbour, a residential service in Torquay; Harbour supports younger adults with Autistic Spectrum conditions, Profound or Multiple Learning Disabilities (PMLD) and significant communication difficulties.

He is supported to travel to Totnes every Monday to attend a group run by ROC, where he has learned how to do welding and wield a hammer creatively.

Lucy, service manager at Harbour, said: “Ben is always very enthusiastic about going to the metal-work group, and he’s learned new skills there which have enabled him to make some really lovely items.”

Ben, who has lived at Harbour for four years, has mild learning difficulties and Asperger’s syndrome.

Lucy said: “We support Ben on a one-to-one basis to attend a variety of other activities too, such as swimming and working at the horticulture project at Seale Hayne in Newton Abbott. He also loves his daily constitutional along the seafront here in Torquay.

“The most important thing is that we’re supporting Ben to engage in activities of his own choice, which is typical of the person-centred care we give at our service. The support we give is about doing things with people, rather than ‘to’ them.

“For us person-centred care means promoting the importance of each person as an individual, treating them with respect and being mindful of their desires, even where there are communications difficulties.”

Regard is currently spearheading a campaign to raise the profile of person-centred care in the UK, having launched its awareness-raising programme with a high-profile reception at the House of Lords in May for opinion-leaders, service users and staff.

Reflecting this approach, people who live at Regard services such as Harbour are involved in all aspects of their support, from the recruitment of staff through to day-to-day matters. Staff appreciate how important this responsibility is to service users and how it reflects their desire to make a genuine contribution.

There is currently a vacancy at Harbour for a self-contained flatlet with its own kitchen, bedroom/living area and en-suite bathroom, which would suit a young adult moving from either residential care or the family home who needs a robust service providing structure and strong communication strategies.

Families interested in further details should contact Lucy on 01803 293 460 or visit the service page below.

Harbour


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Specialism: Harbour is registered to provide services for younger adults with: Autistic Spectrum conditions, Behaviours that may challenge, Profound or Multiple Learning Disabilities

Gwenda, from Beudygwyn Farm, is nominated for a Wales Care Award


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Farmer’s daughter Gwenda Potter was brought up next door to The Regard Group’s Beudygwyn Farm at Carreglefn, near Amlwch, where she now works and recalls the residents visiting her home.

That inspired her to go into the care profession six years ago and to involve the 12 residents of Beudygwyn Farm in the day to day work on the farm.

They are aged between 30 and 70 and have learning disabilities, mental health problems or acquired brain injuries and Gwenda said: “Many of our service users are heavily involved in the work on the farm, one of them cuts the grass and they share the chores.

“It’s a small working farm and having them involved in looking after the sheep and chickens, growing vegetables and collecting eggs is good for them, gives them purpose and new skills and the knowledge of where the food comes from and how it’s produced.”

It’s that imaginative approach to care that has seen Gwenda, nominated for a Wales Care Award in the category, Leadership and Management in Residential or Nursing Care, sponsored by Christie and Co.

The eight-acre smallholding can accommodate up to 14 people and Gwenda, who has a partner and three children, still lives next door and is Welsh-speaking which is often useful as most of the residents are from North Wales.

Other family members had worked at Beudygwyn and Gwenda started there in 2010 as a support worker and trained to become a senior social worker and then deputy manager before taking over.

”I love the job,” she said: “The farm is very rural but it’s only five minutes to the shops and it’s very relaxing and therapeutic.

“It’s very good for the residents to get used to looking after their own environment, to maintain their own home by doing little jobs and the eggs and vegetables produced here are used in the meals they have.

“I wouldn’t change my job at all. As a farmer’s daughter I’ve got the best of both worlds because I’m on a farm and I enjoy a job where little things can mean so much, like teaching a man to fasten his shoelaces for the first time.”

Evette Townley, locality manager for the Regard Partnership, nominated Gwenda for an award, describing her as dedicated and hardworking, and placing residents at the centre of her working ethos.

She said: “Throughout her time Gwenda has worked with the staff, gaining respect from her team both as a support worker and a manager and the service under her leadership continues to grow from strength to strength.

“She strives for high standards of support and inclusion, empowerment and autonomy for the individuals for whom Beudygwyn is home.”

Gwenda holds regular meetings and training sessions for the residents which gives them a voice in their care and allows them to gain knowledge of their own diagnosis.

Evette added: “Gwenda’s dedication, hard work and knowledge have enabled her to become amentor for other newly appointed managers in the region.

“She provides solid support for those managers by passing on her enthusiasm, dedication and person-centered ethos.”

Mario Kreft MBE, Chairman of Care Forum Wales, said the Wales Care Awards had gone from strength to strength.

He said: “The event is now firmly established as one of the highlights in the Welsh social care calendar.

“The aim is to recognise the unstinting and often remarkable dedication of our unsung heroes and heroines across Wales.

“The care sector is full of wonderful people because it’s not just a job it’s a vocation – these are the people who really do have the X Factor.

“If you don’t recognise the people who do the caring you will never provide the standards that people need and never recognise the value of the people who need the care in society.

“We need to do all we can to raise the profile of the care sector workforce - they deserve to be lauded and applauded.”

Beudygwyn Farm


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Andy, from Cerrig Camu, is nominated for a Wales Care Award


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Andrew Papirnyk, who decided on a career in caring after visiting Cerrig Camu residential home to do some building work and eventually rose to become its manager, has been nominated for a Wales Care Award.

Andy went along to Cerrig Camu in Dolgellau in the winter of 2004 to do some labouring work for the firm he was with at the time.

He quickly struck up a rapport with some of its residents and immediately opted to make caring his profession.

Nine years later he was appointed as the home’s registered manager and has been commended for the way he runs it and credited for helping to integrate clients with learning disabilities and mental health needs into the community.

It is this dedicated approach to his caring role that landed Andrew a place in the final of the 2016 Wales Care Awards at City Hall in Cardiff on Friday October 21.

Andrew, is nominated in the Excellence in Learning Disability and Mental Health category.

He is originally from Barmouth and after finishing his school days at Ysgol Ardudwy in Harlech went straight into the building trade.

He said: “I’d been working as a labourer for a couple of years when I went to Cerrig Camu to do some building work there.

“At that stage I didn’t know what I wanted to do in life, so when I started to talk with some of the service users and managed to build up a rapport with them I felt that caring was a career I could go into.

“Not long afterwards I started at Cerrig Camu as a support worker and then gradually worked my way up through the ranks, going from team leader and support manager until I became service manager in June 2013.”

Cerrig Camu Residential Service


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

OWL Cerrig Camu


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To book a day at an OWL service online please click here: BOOK ONLINE

An innovative project has been set up

Being Person-Led not just Person-Centred at Regard: R.I.S.E


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At The Regard Group we believe that it is important to go one step further than being person-centred – to become person-led.

We want to empower the people we support to become fully involved, not just in their own care and support, but in the ‘bigger decisions’ that affect the homes they live in. We believe giving them a voice to help us make decisions, even when there are communication difficulties, builds the self-esteem of the people we support and helps them to become more independent. Our teams appreciate how important this responsibility is to people and how it reflects their desire to make a genuine contribution.

Following the success of last year’s pilot project, our service user involvement groups called RISE@Regard are being rolled out across all of our regions.

The first group was set up in our London and Surrey region. The people we support in this region were asked:

• Would they like to become more actively involved in decisions about their support, how it is delivered along with a broader aims and involvement in the company and their communities?

• Who wanted to come and where did they want to meet?

• What did people want to get out of it?

• Which staff should be involved? (both to support people to attend and to lead the meetings)

Everyone agreed that a casual, informal meeting would be held to start the group. Five staff and eight of the people they support discussed what they wanted to change and become involved in.

Mike from Gordon Avenue said ‘They shouldn’t do things about us without asking us’

The group chose the name RISE@Regard as they said that Respect, Independence, Speech/being heard and Equality are important to them.

In subsequent meetings the group went on to write a Charter with detail about six elements they would like staff teams, managers and the people they support to sign up to. These are:

1. We must be at the centre of our care planning and any decisions made about our lives.

2. We want to live our lives independently

3. We want to be more involved in our community.

4. We would like to have an active part in audits and inspections which take place in our homes.

5. We need to be involved in staff recruitment.

6. We would like to know about the ‘big decisions’ The Regard Group makes about our homes and our care.

All of the regional teams in Regard are signing up to this Charter as well as developing local R.I.S.E groups.

Caroline finds her feet at Cloverdale House


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Caroline, who lives at Cloverdale House , our residential service in Hove, is keen to move from her wheelchair into her dancing shoes after an amazing six-month turnaround.

When Caroline moved into Cloverdale House in March she was wheelchair-bound and unable to stand at all, but after an amazing team effort from the support staff at Cloverdale, the involvement of some dedicated therapists, and a good deal of determination on Caroline’s part, she is now back on her feet and going from strength to strength.

Service Manager, Trevor Wilcox, said: “When Caroline moved in she was very reserved and anxious, and the history from her previous home was unclear as to why exactly Caroline was unable to walk. Initially she was not use to using a hoist and found it scary. She also disliked the shower and had communications difficulties which resulted in her becoming frustrated at times.”

As they got to know Caroline better, Trevor and his team developed a strategy to motivate her and help improve her quality of life, including inspiring confidence in using the hoist by giving her a certificate for ‘Excellent Use,’ aided by support from an occupational therapist. The support workers at Cloverdale House worked hard to interpret Caroline’s speech and can now appreciate her fabulous sense of humour.

Trevor said: “She’s developed a real bond with us, and is relaxed and even quite extrovert within the home. And, most excitingly, after a period of time staff noticed Caroline was able to stand, and at times got herself into bed. She started crossing her legs in her chair demonstrating greater strength. With the encouragement and praise from her support workers, she gradually started to walk with two members of staff, one to support and the other behind Caroline with her wheelchair. We were amazed at the distances Caroline was able to walk and the movement within her legs, so we contacted a physiotherapist who has been able to support her to walk around our garden and demonstrated some simple exercises that could help develop the strength and mobility in her legs.”

A special frame has now been ordered for Caroline with a seat and brakes, delivery of which is expected shortly. She is very excited at the prospect of walking, continuing to make progress with the help of her physiotherapist and her support workers, and looking forward to the day when she’ll be able to dance the night away without the use of her chair.

Trevor said: “This kind of support is typical of the person-centred care that we give at our service. Our underlying philosophy is about doing things with people, rather than ‘to’ them.

Cloverdale is run by Regard, the UK’s fourth largest private organisation which provides supported living and residential services for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and acquired brain injury, and is currently spearheading a campaign to raise the profile of person-centred care.

There are currently two vacanct rooms at Cloverdale:, a private en-suite room on the top floor and a similar en-suite room on the ground floor of the spacious 11-bed house with communal kitchen, dining room and lounge, and a very large garden with a sensory cabin.

Cloverdale House is two minutes’ walk from the sea front in Hove, is close to the town’s shops, library, cafes, pubs, restaurants, and has good bus and train access.

Further information is available from Cloverdale’s service manager, Trevor Wilcox, on 01273 733757

Cloverdale House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

National Recruitment Week W/C 26th September 2016


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Join us for our biggest recruitment campaign of all time during our National Recruitment Week - W/C 26th September 2016.

This is a great opportunity for you to meet staff and service users to discuss career opportunities and training that is offered by Regard.

Below are dates of events taking place across the UK;

When: Friday 30th September
Where: Bay Lodge, 36 Fen Road, Holbeach, Lincolnshire. PE12 8QA
Time: 10am – 1pm
Contact: Roz Ewing, Tel: 01406 424197 Email: bay.lodge@regard.co.uk
About the event: Come and join us for coffee and homemade cake in aid of MacMillan. You will have the opportunity to talk to staff about the role of a support worker and the excellent training opportunities offered by The Regard Group. You will also have the opportunity to meet some of our service users and see the fantastic work we do.

When: Monday 26th September
Where: Dolgellau Free Library, Mill Street, Dolgellau, Gwynedd, LL40 1EY
Time: 10am – 3pm
Contact: Darren Andrews (Activities Co-ordinator) for further information about the event on; 01341 423 075 or email CerrigCamu.OWL@regard.co.uk
About the event: You will have the opportunity to talk to staff about vacancies and training opportunities offered by Regard.

When: Wednesday 28th September
Where: The Baptist Church, High street, Tywyn, Gwynedd, LL36 9AD
Time: 10am – 2pm
Contact: Simon Moore (Service Manager) for further information about the event on; 01654 711801 or email Domcareagency.nthwales@regard.co.uk
About the event: You will have the opportunity to talk to staff about vacancies and training opportunities offered by Regard. You will also have the opportunity to meet service users and see the great work we do. Plus not to mention enjoy tea/coffee with some homemade cakes.

When: Wednesday 28th September
Where: Job Centre in Cardigan (Crown Buidlings, Napier Street, Cardigan, Ceredigion, SA43 1EF)
Time: 10am – 1pm
Contact Katie Owen (Service Manager) for further information about the event on; 01239 654483
About the event: You will have the opportunity to talk to staff about vacancies and training opportunities offered by Regard. You will also have the opportunity to meet service users and see the great work we do.

Love is in the air at Arrowe Hall


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Two young people with complex needs who live at the same supported living service in The Wirral are over the moon after announcing their engagement.

Shelley (25) and Simon (28) are both part of the supported living community at Arrowe Hall, which is home to 23 individuals with learning disabilities, mental health needs or acquired brain injury.

Shelley said: “When I first moved into Arrowe Hall I was very shy, I couldn’t look at people in the face when I was talking to them, but now I am very loud and a great character to be around.

“We got engaged at my birthday party - Simon got down on one knee and gave me a ring.

“We like going out to eat together, the cinema, watching DVD’s and annoying each other. We have a hamster together which Simon keeps in his flat.

“He cooks for me so I don’t burn down the kitchen. I love Simon and I will marry him one day - I have just got to get him well trained first.”

Arrowe Hall’s service manager, Stephanie, said: “Simon has lived with us since 2014 and is passionate about Arrowe Hall, which is a very interesting and attractive stately home.

“He’s keen to put together a written record of the 181-year-old house, and is always researching whatever he can about its architecture and history.

“Shelley has brought out his romantic side, and it’s lovely to see how happy they are in each other’s company.”

Shelley and Simon are both looking forward to a full autumnal season of activities at Arrowe Hall, which they can be fully involved in planning, alongside the service’s new activities co-ordinator Nicola Baxter.

Nicola, who joined the service this month, will be working closely with all the individuals who live at Arrowe Hall to ensure a full programme of activities, including fundraisers, days out, sensory activities and cookery skills.

Stephanie said: “We all work closely with the people we support to ensure their accommodation and the activities we support them in reflect their needs and caters for their interests. The result is a community where everyone is settled and living happily together.”

Arrowe Hall holds regular ‘speak out’ meetings, involving all who live and work at the service, to ensure the views of tenants are able to influence the way Arrowe Hall is run.

Small staff teams are provided for each individual to provide consistent care and allow meaningful relationships to develop. The staff is as diverse as the group it supports, sharing an extensive background in the health and social care sector, much experience in working with autism and mental health issues, and a passion for caring and promoting independence.

They liaise with family members regarding on-going care and activities, and work hard with those who live at the service to integrate them within the wider community.

Plans for four new detached bungalow-style properties to be built in the Hall’s extensive grounds are well advanced. The accommodation, which will suit more complex and challenging service users, should be ready for occupation next year. Families interested in more detail about the new units can contact Diane Carole on 07984 736 457.

Arrowe Hall


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Specialism: Arrowe Hall is a beautiful stately home set in its own grounds within a large municipal park and golf course. The tenants

Shiver me timbers they’re all talking like pirates at Highdowns


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Buccaneers and scallywags waved the Jolly Roger and had fun walking the plank during ‘Talk Like A Pirate’ day at Highdowns, a rural service for people with learning disabilities near Camborne, Cornwall.

Service manager, Jenna, said: “Today is ‘International Talk Like A Pirate Day’ so we’ve all given it a bit of the old heave-ho to plan a fun-filled pirate-themed day as a fundraiser in aid of MIND.

“We were ho-ho-hoping for a good turn-out, having invited quite a number of landlubbers – friends and family – to join us for the day, and we weren’t disappointed.

“Fancy dress was optional, but the people we support love the excuse to dress up, so there have been a lot of eye-patches, pirate hats and skulls and cross-bones around today.

“And although we haven’t got any pieces of eight, we’ve had plenty of pieces of cake – Gilly, Simon, Donna and Ben have all been busy baking cakes to sell, and Douglas has made his Cornish speciality, heavy cake, which is delicious.”

MIND is Regard’s chosen national charity for 2016, with fundraising events being undertaken at Regard services throughout the UK all year long, featuring activities such as sponsored or fundraising barbecues, picnics, walks/runs, muddy obstacle courses, bake-offs, tombolas, charity days and auctions.

Nearly £3,000 has already been raised this year, and Highdowns’ pirate day just added another £32 to the total.

Jenna said: “Regard’s staff and service users vote annually for a charity they wish to support, and the organisation matches every pound raised by the staff and service users with a pound from the corporate coffers.

“These kind of fundraising activities provide a sense of purpose for the people we support, as well as allowing them to connect to their community, make new friends, and develop their social skills.”

Highdowns is home to up to 14 people with learning disabilities, mental health issues and parallel complex needs.

The service occupies a 10-acre site, with service users living in four properties in the grounds, as well as a variety of animals which the individuals help care for, including sheep, ducks, rabbits, peacocks and hens.

The farm also has a polytunnel where people who live on the farm grow their own fruit and vegetables.

We are also due to open a new supported living service, Meadow View, just outside Redruth next year. After refurbishment, the service will offer two roomy self-contained flats plus a main house with six large en-suite bedrooms, communal areas, and extensive grounds.

Referrals are already being taken, and families interested to know more should contact the referrals hotline on 0800 840 0313, or visit the service page below.

Highdowns


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Specialism: Learning Disabilities, Mental Health issues and other concurrent complex needs. Individuals with Asperger’s and/or other Autistic spectrum conditions and Individuals

Meadow View


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Specialism: Meadow View is a new supported living service designed to offer support and accommodation for adults with learning disabilities, autistic spectrum conditions,

Passion, honesty and cleaning loos: what makes a social care leader


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This article first appeared on The Guardian Social Care Network which you can visit by clicking here:

Guardian Social Care

Think of the words used to describe successful leaders: tough, uncompromising, driven. But these words translate differently when applied to social care. Our interaction with vulnerable people makes the difference, so here’s my list of the top five essential leadership qualities for the sector:

Can-do attitude

Soon after I joined Regard I visited a service and noticed a toilet was not as clean as it should have been. I asked for the kit to clean the loo myself, proceeded to do so, then said: “Now this meets my standards.” Word spread like wildfire. I never needed to do anything like that again.

A can-do attitude means you’re prepared to set an example by tackling whatever needs doing, including the less pleasant parts of a job. It’s much more effective than harsh criticism: when your actions communicate to colleagues that you’re in active pursuit of common goals, there’s a huge emotional appeal.

This quality can be learned, usually from a colleague whose attitude has motivated you. I’d like to think I set an example that inspires a can-do attitude at Regard – certainly, my staff work incredibly hard and get on with their jobs in a positive way.

Honesty

This is vital in all walks of life, even when dealing with a negative situation. Ignoring something unfortunate won’t make it go away. Facing a problem makes it easier to deal with: the ostrich mentality just doesn’t work.

Sometimes I have to go to our board of directors with news they’d rather not hear, but it has to be done – it’s part of the job.

You can’t have integrity without honesty, supported by strong moral principles – and how could you provide excellent social care without that? Everything needs to be above board. I don’t think honesty can be learned; by adulthood you either value honesty, or you don’t.

Decisiveness

In social care, maybe more than most sectors, an indecisive leader is an ineffective leader: even a wrong decision can be better than no decision. If a leader is indecisive, support staff become uncertain themselves, and this creates a difficult working environment. And because the individuals we support are so vulnerable, lack of consistency can cause genuine anguish.

Of course decisiveness must be tempered by being well-informed – fact-finding is crucial – but those decisions have to be made. In my experience, people either procrastinate or are decisive, not both, but individuals can be trained to be more decisive.

Hardworking

In my day you didn’t need to go to university to get on in the world, and I didn’t go. You could build a successful career by working hard without a degree. But I mean working hard, not just working hard enough.

It’s not about being the last one to leave the office, it’s about focus and application. Work-life balance is very important – outside responsibilities and interests all make demands on our time – but while you are at work you should be applying yourself wholeheartedly to what you are expected to do.

When leaders are hardworking this often rubs off on employees, but a willingness to work hard is probably innate, not learned.

Passion

Having a passion for what you do is especially important in social care because caring is not an easy career. We are surrounded by rules and regulations and face daily challenges that can get you down. But what we do really matters. And if you show you’re passionate about the care you deliver it becomes an addictive thing for your staff.

It can manifest itself in small ways. Should an employee come to me with a small request – say new literature for their reception – it demonstrates pride in their job. Although it may be a long way down your to-do list, it may be at the top of theirs. It takes courage to approach the boss with such a request, so it’s important not to ignore this kind of initiative. It makes me angry if I’ve passed on a simple request from a junior colleague and it isn’t promptly actioned.

The same goes for whistleblowing – what courage that takes – and because it’s always a big deal for those concerned, it absolutely demands a leader’s full attention.

I’ve been involved in all manner of charity work over the past three decades, which has taught me much that feeds into my approach towards a client base that needs a passionate lead from the top.

My cup is always half-full - I think that’s innate - but I am very lucky to live the life I do, and I believe I get the most out of it because I am naturally a very positive person.

Sandie Foxall-Smith is the CEO of Regard and was named Investors in People’s ‘Leader of the Year’ 2016

Time to Tweet - Regard’s new Twitter account


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We now have a Twitter account which you can follow here:

TWITTER

You will find our latest news and success stories and we are currently running a #votesandie campaign for the Power 50 awards. If you re-tweet this please use #votesandie.

The Regard Awards – Celebrating Excellent Support - Winners for this quarter


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Congratulations to the following team and individuals who have won our this quarter’s internal awards. They will receive a framed certificate, pin badge and a £50 voucher (£100 for teams).

Outstanding Team

Winner: Northfields House team, East and Dorset

The Northfields House team were nominated by Julie Bendelow and Chris Sheppard. Chris is the brother of David Shappard. David sadly passed away shortly after staff helped him to celebrate his 50th birthday in style. Julie said “Working in partnership with the LA and the health care team (OT, GP, Advocate) and with David’s brother, adaptations were made to the service to enable him to remain at home, in familiar surroundings and with people he knew. A ground floor room was created and a memory wall, full of photos of David and his friends and family, put together. This was all done within a week. David was also coming up for 50 – and the team arranged a 50th party – with banners featuring David’s face, balloons, party and friends old and new invited. The memories that this party created will live on forever for the family of David. At a recent professionals meeting, the OT, GP, Social Worker, Chris and advocate all praised the team for their commitment and support to David and his family during a very difficult time.” David’s brother, Chris contacted Julie to request that the Northfields House team be nominated for an award after seeing a previous award announcement in the newsletter.

Shortlisted:

Evette Townley-Keogh’s Locality, Wales NW &SW

Douglas House, Wales NW &SW

Hook Lane, London, Surrey, W Sussex/Hants

Alderton House, East & Dorset

Continuous Improvement

Winner: Cerrig Cornel team, Wales NW &SW

The Cerrig Cornel Team were nominated by Simon Moore, Acting Manager. Simon said, “They are a great team, taking pride in their work and Cerrig Cornel as a service. They strive to make the service the best it can be, decorating tired looking areas, taking direction from SSWs and management as well as working on own initiative.

A family member of one of the people they support said, “The site looks beautiful with hanging baskets, tubs and flowers, Our son continues to be happy and settled and we think all the staff are doing a great job. I think all the staff and service users would benefit from being nominated for an award as recognition for the work they put into Cerrig Cornel.”

Shortlisted:

Oaklands team, East & Dorset

Kelly Lidiard, SSW, The Mill, East & Dorset

Vicky Clifton, Regional Co-ordinator, Kent and East Sussex

Living Our Values

Winner: Lisa Gallop, Lead SSW, Rochester House, Kent and East Sussex

Lisa was nominated by Mike Hand, Service Manager who said, “Lisa has been Lead Senior Support Worker at Rochester House for the past 12 months and has been fundamental in the changes and improvements that have been made at the service. There have been significant improvements made in both the quality and performance of the service and Lisa has been a driving force in these changes. The service has suffered the loss of a service user and Lisa showed amazing empathy and support for everyone involved – from staff and the people we support to the family of the person in question. Lisa demonstrates all of the values that Regard adopt, including being extremely hard working, delivering exceptional compassionate care and always striving to achieve excellence in everything she does. Lisa is adaptable, efficient and manages her time very effectively in order to work across the service and support everyone involved.”

Shortlisted:

Becky Cretten, Service Manager, Ambleside, London, Surrey, W Sussex/Hants

Tara Sweetman, SSW, Llwyngwian Fawr, Wales NW &SW

Simon Moore, Acting Manager, Cerrig Cornel, Wales NW &SW

Karen Bailey, Service Manager, Lambourne House, London, Surrey, W Sussex/Hants

Karen Freeman, Service Manager, Northfields House, East & Dorset

Samantha Phillips, Team Leader, Dom Care Dorset, East & Dorset

Sue Snelling, Service Manager, Girling St, St Faiths Villa and Walnut Tree, East & Dorset

Northfields House


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Specialism: Adults with a learning disability. At Northfields we work with people who have complex needs and a high level of vulnerability including

Cerrig Cornel


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Specialism: The service is registered to provide support to people who have learning disabilities, including those with Autism/Asperger syndrome. The service can

Rochester House


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Specialism Learning: Disability, autism and complex health and physical needs.

Type of Service: The environment has full accessibility to people using

Vote Sandie!


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​Sandie Foxall-Smith, Regard CEO, has been short-listed for the HealthInvestor Power Fifty 2016.

The HealthInvestor Power Fifty is about recognising those in the independent health sector who are affecting real change. It is about those individuals within the market that exert the most influence, command the most respect, and, ultimately, hold the most power. The final list will be revealed at 8 Northumberland Avenue in central London on Wednesday 23 November 2016.

Anyone can vote. To register your vote for Sandie please click here.

Mike and Lisa are in the finals of the National Learning Disability Awards


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Good luck to Mike Hand from Rochester House and Lisa Runnalls from Douglas House who are in the finals of the National Learning Disability Awards this Thursday!

We will be keeping our fingers crossed for you.

Word up for scrabble fan Jo from Caeronnen


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A self-confessed Scrabble fanatic from Ceredigion is spelling out her support for charity with a sponsored match to raise money for people with mental health problems.

Jo who lives at Caeronnen supported living service in the seaside village of Llangrannog has been taking on support staff on behalf of the charity MIND.

The 69-year-old former driving instructor loves nothing better than taking on all-comers with her astonishing mastery of words.

Said Katie, who leads the team at Caeronnen: “Although Jo needs practical help and guidance to lead the life she chooses, she is nevertheless an unbelievably intelligent lady and pretty much knows everything about everything.

“Playing Scrabble on a regular basis really helps to keep her mind agile, and is the kind of activity that can give great pleasure to people with autism and dementia.”

Jo moved to her new home three months ago from a service in Aberystwyth and is very much involved with her support team to ensure they meet her needs.

Caeronnen provides support for adults with autism, Asperger syndrome, learning difficulties, mental health issues or acquired brain injury.

Katie said: “We provide individuals with complex needs with their own team so they can develop quality relationships with those who support them, and we’re experienced in managing challenging behaviours.

“Twenty-four hour background staffing is provided, to enable us to provide the necessary support for the people who live with us and encourage them to develop their life skills.”

Caeronnen is based in a detached bungalow split into two accommodation areas, both of which have their own kitchen, bathroom and lounge/dining area, with shared use of the communal facilities and private bedrooms for each individual living there.

Regard is currently spearheading a national campaign to raise the profile of person-centred care which means promoting the importance of each person as an individual, treating them with respect and being mindful of their desires, even where there are communications difficulties.

Katie said: “In practice this means we are doing things with people, rather than ‘to’ them, ensuring for example that Jo can choose books she’ll enjoy reading, including her favourite subject - human evolution - which she’s passionately interested in.

“It’s also a high priority for Jo to have the opportunity to view and debate the seasonal sports on TV, such as the Euros – she’s enthusiastically supporting Wales – and Wimbledon.”

Service users are involved in all aspects of their support, from the recruitment of staff through to day-to-day matters.

Because Caeronnen is a new service it is not yet fully occupied. Further information, for people who would benefit from living in their own space with a personalised care package to suit their needs, is available from Regard’s referrals hotline on 0800 840 0313.

Caeronnen


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Specialism: The service supports adults with Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Learning Difficulties, Mental Health, or ABI, substance misuse issues or with a history of

Caring for Judy’s best interests at Ivers House


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The staff team at Ivers House have been praised for the outstanding support they provided at a difficult time in the life of one of the individuals we support.

Judy moved into Ivers House in the village of Marnhull near Shaftesbury in 2010. The service specialises in supporting people with learning difficulties.

Service manager Gina said: “Judy made a lot of friends at Ivers and has been an active member of our community for the past six years, so when she was diagnosed with dementia and suffered a rapid decline in health we were all very sad about it.”

At meetings which included Judy’s brother, social worker and an independent advocate, Judy’s needs were discussed, as well as the impact on the other three ladies with whom she shared a home.

Gina said: “It was a tough decision, but we all agreed that a move to a service with the equipment and experience to support the unique needs of a person with a learning disability and dementia was in Judy’s best interests.

“Our focus then became providing a sensitive, smooth and caring transition for her. We’re going to miss her so much, but our objective is to provide dedicated person-centred care, and what was right for Judy was what Judy got.”

Unfortunately, during the transition process, Judy suffered a stroke and had to be admitted to hospital.

For some weeks it was touch and go, but Judy rallied and got stronger again. It was agreed that it would be more sensitive for Judy to go to her new placement from hospital to avoid any distress that a brief return to Ivers might cause her.

And here – according to all involved – is where the Ivers team really came into their own: supporting Judy when she was in hospital, accompanying her when she underwent tests and procedures, bringing her iPad so she could watch her favourite films and making sure the nursing staff had all the necessary information about her at their disposal.

When the new placement was confirmed the team put together a memory book crammed full of photos of Judy with her brother, her friends and her support staff team, showing her enjoying parties, holidays, Easter, Halloween and Christmas.

Gina said: “The team took everything to the new home in advance so that when Judy arrived she would see things she knew and which had meaning for her – her toy cat, cuddly dog, photos of her brother, her favourite blanket and nightdress, quilt cover and toiletries.”

A staff member from Ivers accompanied Judy in the hospital transport, reassuring her and supplying her favourite snacks for the three-hour journey. Another followed in the car with the rest of Judy’s personal belongings.

On the journey her support worker team showed Judy photos she had taken of her new room, the house she was moving to and the manager of the home, to familiarise her with her new environment before she arrived.

After settling Judy into her new room, both members of the Ivers House team stayed locally for the night, putting the needs of Judy before those of their own families. This enabled them to see her again the morning after her first night in a strange place and give the support and reassurance that she needed and deserved.

The memory book was given to the new team so they could get to know Judy and look at the photos with her to encourage interaction.

Back at Ivers House, staff shared with Judy’s old friends the photos of her new home so they could see where their friend had moved to.

Gina said: “I couldn’t be prouder of the way my team have supported Judy. They acted with such compassion and humanity, and were an absolute credit to our organisation.”

Judy’s brother, Charles said: “I would like to say a huge thank you for supporting Judy so brilliantly over the past six years and for making her move run so smoothly. Providing staff to travel with her and to help her to settle in to her new home was really doing that extra something and is very much appreciated.”

The service currently has two vacancies, one in the main house annexe and one in an adjacent bungalow.

Service users are involved in a day programme tailored to their individual needs. Facilities include an internet/computer suite, a kitchen for cookery lessons and healthy living groups, arts and crafts facilities and a drama room. Animal care and horticultural activities also take place in Ivers’ four-acre grounds.

Families with an adult with learning difficulties can learn more by calling the Regard referral line on 0800 840 0313.

Ivers House


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We are holding an event in July for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

International Investors in People Award – Winner!


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We are delighted and extremely proud to announce that Regard and ACH CEO, Sandie Foxall-Smith won the prestigious ‘Leader of the Year’ Award at last night’s Investors in People ceremony.

The award recognises inspirational leadership and Sandie won from a shortlist that included leaders from Arriva Rail North, Wheatley Group, Cornerstone and Age UK.

After receiving the award Sandie paid tribute to her team. She said: “Leaders can only be successful if they have a group of people that sign on to a vision and want to make it happen. We certainly have that at Regard.

“I am also pleased that this is recognition for the care industry. Quite understandably the focus is often on carers and those who deliver the service in the front line. But their job is made better if you have a strong management structure behind them that is driving a business that is sustainable and makes money that can be invested in improving standards.”

The IIP Awards, which received over 300 entries, celebrate the best people management practices among Investors in People accredited businesses.

The Leader of the Year Award is by far the most competitive individual award. The winner must communicate a clear purpose and vision with passion, enthusiasm and energy.

Sandie was praised for her achievements which included ‘a demonstrable track record of delivering results for the organisation’ and for being a ‘leader who is decisive and gives clear direction for people.’

Regard holds the prestigious gold standard awarded by Investors In People, and is one of just four out of the 17,000 care organisations in the country to have achieved this status.

Being good neighbours is so important to the people who live at Bradwell House


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Being good neighbours is so important to the people with learning difficulties who live at Bradwell House in Hythe that they invited all their neighbours to join them on Saturday (11 June) for a celebratory garden party and barbecue to mark the 90th birthday of HRH Elizabeth II.

Service manager Maria said: “We all enjoy playing an active role in the local community so we invited lots of the people who live near us, including the owners of the corner shop and people we know from the local pub, and were delighted that our invitations were so warmly received.

“The people we support have had such a great time planning and preparing for our garden party, and they certainly enjoyed themselves with their neighbours, friends and family members on the day.

“At the suggestion of one of the gents who live with us, we also sent an invitation to the Queen herself, but regretfully she was otherwise engaged.”

Offering 24-hour residential accommodation for 10 people with learning difficulties, Bradwell House occupies a quiet neighbourhood of Hythe, just over a mile inland from the sea-front.

Maria said: “Our aim is always to help the people we support live life to the full, so they make the most of local education services and work placements, as well as a wide variety of clubs and activities such as horse-riding and trips to the local pub and tearooms.”

Specialising in learning disability, with accompanying diagnosis such as epilepsy, visual impairment and behavioural and emotional difficulties, Bradwell House currently has one en-suite room available on the first floor, and families with an adult with learning difficulties can learn more by calling the Regard referral line: 0800 840 0313.

Bradwell House


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Specialism: Adults with a learning disability, and accompanying diagnosis such as epilepsy, visual impairment and behavioural and emotional difficulties.

Details of

Best of both worlds for Nathan at Cerrig Camu


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The prospect of a college cookery course is whetting the appetite of 25-year-old Liverpool FC fan Nathan, who lives at one of our residential services for people with learning difficulties on the outskirts of Dolgellau.

Nathan, who moved to Cerrig Camu last March, told his support staff how much he wanted to learn to cook, so they helped him identify a suitable course at the local college, attend a tester day and enrol on a cookery course which will start in September.

Andrew, service manager at Cerrig Camu, said: “This kind of support is typical of the person-centred care that we give at our service. Our underlying philosophy is about doing things with people, rather than ‘to’ them.

Andrew said: “All the support staff at Cerrig Camu are now using Regard’s new method of data capture - Personal Daily Outcomes (PDOs) - which is great because it’s simpler and quicker to use than previous methods, and at the same time it delivers much better results for the people we support.

“The system enables us to carry out entirely person-centred planning and recording of outcomes in a way that successfully communicates the essence of those individuals.”

Nathan is supported on a one-to-one basis to attend a variety of activities such as shopping for weekly foods, attending the local leisure centre to play squash, use the gym and go swimming.

He also enjoys going for walks with staff in the local area, visiting castles and going to the cinema, as well as visiting the local pub to watch his beloved Liverpool FC.

Regular weekend visits home to stay with his dad are another very important feature in Nathan’s life.

Andrew said: “We recognise how important their relationship is to them both, so we support Nathan to get to the local train station where he meets his dad and they travel together to and from his dad’s home, then we meet him again at the train station after the weekend.

“We use a PDO with Nathan so his day is set up for him, however - as Nathan likes flexibility and in accordance with our person-centred approaches - the activities are not set to a particular day and Nathan is then encouraged to choose his preferred activity.”

Nathan lives in a shared house which has space for three service users, with access to a lounge, kitchen/dining area and individual bedrooms, all with en-suite bathrooms.

Nathan says what he likes best about living at Cerrig Camu is doing activities with staff, walks to town, watering the vegetable patch on site, and going to the service’s onsite OWL (Outcomes With Learning) day centre where staff support him to with cookery, woodwork and computers.

He also loves his Liverpool-themed bedroom which he helped design.

People who live at the services are involved in all aspects of their support, from the recruitment of staff through to day-to-day matters. Staff appreciate how important this responsibility is to service users and how it reflects their desire to make a genuine contribution.

There are currently three rooms available in the recently refurbished 14-bed manor house which is at the heart of Cerrig Camu. The building is divided into three separate services, each self-contained on its own separate floor, with shared living rooms and a kitchen diner on each floor where people can come together to socialise.

Further information is available from Cerrig Camu’s service manager, Andrew, on 01341 423 075.

Cerrig Camu Residential Service


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

The Regard Awards – Celebrating Excellent Support


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Congratulations to the following team and individuals who have won our inaugural, quarterly internal awards.

Outstanding Team

Winners: Rochester House, Kent & East Sussex

The Rochester House team were nominated by Mike Hand for the following reasons:

‘Rochester House has gone through many changes over recent years, including changes to management that has impacted greatly on the team and the support they gave the service users. Last year, CQC carried out an unannounced inspection of Rochester House and deemed the service to be rated ‘Requires Improvement’ in all 5 areas. However, with the hard work, dedication and consistent approach of the staff team they were awarded a rating of ‘Good’ in all 5 areas at the latest unannounced CQC inspection in February 2016. The service and staff have also recently received some very positive feedback and compliments from external people including a care manager, family of a service user and an external DoLS best interest assessor.’

Shortlisted:

Alderton, East & Dorset

Oaklands, East & Dorset

Ashford Lodge, Kent & East Sussex

Beech Trees, London, Surrey, Hampshire & West Sussex

Sharon Chrystal/Julie Thomas, London, Surrey, Hampshire & West Sussex

Llwyngwian Fawr, Wales, NW & SW

Continuous Improvement

Winner: Emma Jarrett, Manager, Homeleigh, Wales, NW & SW

Emma was nominated by Diane Carole for the following reasons:

‘After supporting the previous Service Manager through extended leave Emma then quickly stepped up to Acting Manager and continuing her Deputy Manager role when the post former became vacant. Since her formal appointment to Service Manager, Emma (with the support of Evette, her LM) has achieved green status at Crescent Road following an audit in March, brought recruitment up to capacity, supported staff and residents through a major reconfiguration of the service and improved internal processes and procedures. Through all these changes and challenges Emma has stayed positive and most importantly kept good relationships with Local Authorities and residents. Prior to the completion of the first two flats Homeleigh was also full, which is another great achievement for such a large and complex service.

Shortlisted:

Claire King, Senior Support Worker, Sudbury

Kelly Liddiard, Senior Support Worker, Mill House

Andy Jupp, Manager, Kingsdown

Louise Ridger, HR Officer, Kingston

Jenny Telford, Auditor, Kingston

Polly Riley, Head of Payroll, Kingston

James Gwabya, Manager, Rosebank

Gowri Craig, Senior Support Worker, Kneller Road

Dom Care South Wales Team

Natalie Burridge, Manager, DC Cheshire

Stuart Thompson, Support Worker, Arrowe Hall

Living Our Values

Winner: Viv Collin, Manager, Willoughby Services

Viv was nominated by Katrina Greff for the following reasons:

‘The Lincolnshire services have opened as adult services in the past year and grown at a greater speed than anyone imagined. One person really stands out - Viv Collin who was acting manager for Roman House now supported living manager for Lincolnshire. Viv has remained professional and dignified throughout the closure of children services, when confronted with the adversity of the situation. Viv now manages two supported living services for people with challenging needs and has transferred her skills from children to adults with ease.

Viv works extremely hard, and it is not often she goes home on time or is not working from home to improve the services. Viv is approachable and nothing is too much trouble, she will always goes out her way to help others out.

Shortlisted:

Ian Schofield, Maintenance Supervisor, Kingston

Julia Jones, Support Worker, Arden House

Jacqui Gooden, Regional Coordinator, Kent and East Sussex

Steve Butler, Maintenance, Kingston

Charlotte Hunter, Credit Controller, Kingston

Ruth Daly, Manager, Thames House

Josie Goodwin, Senior Support Worker, Beudygwyn

Rochester House


Front_of_House

Specialism Learning: Disability, autism and complex health and physical needs.

Type of Service: The environment has full accessibility to people using

Homeleigh


Homeleigh

We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Littlebury Lodge


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Specialism: Supported living service for people with learning disabilities or mental health needs with a focus on developing further independent skills. We can

Willoughby Lodge


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Specialism: Supported living service for people with learning disabilities or mental health needs with a focus on developing further independent skills. We can

Pear Tree Lodge


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Specialism: Supported living service for people with learning disabilities or mental health needs with a focus on developing further independent skills. We can

Excellence in Person-Centred Support at Withersfield Lodge


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A group of people with learning disabilities are making the most of the recent sunny weather with barbecues and picnics at the supported living service where they live at Haverhill in Suffolk.

John Jopling who leads the team supporting the individuals who live at Withersfield Lodge said: “They’re really enjoying being able to eat outside now that it’s warmer, and are having a great time deciding what they want to eat and preparing their own food.

“These are the normal things of daily life which most of us take for granted, and it’s incredibly rewarding when the support we give our service users enables them to independently achieve these pleasures.”

Withersfield Lodge specialises in supporting people who have previously lived in a residential setting and require support to make choices and decisions in their lives.

John said: “We encourage the people we support to have confidence in making choices, and work hard to build on and develop their daily living skills which in turn enables them to manage their own health and lifestyle.

“The wishes of the people we support are central to everything we do. Person-centred care is not just about activities, it is about considering people’s desires and aspirations, seeing the person as an individual and being respectful.”

Where possible individuals are supported to manage their own finances and health as well as being taught life skills such as road safety and receiving help in finding employment.

Due to the success of the way the Withersfield Lodge team works, one individual has recently moved out to live in even more independent accommodation leaving a vacancy in a first floor en-suite room.

People who use Regard’s services are involved in all aspects of their support, from the recruitment of staff through to day-to-day matters. Staff appreciate how important this responsibility is to service users and how it reflects their desire to make a genuine contribution.

Families with an adult with learning difficulties seeking to make the transition to independent living can learn more by calling the Regard referral line: 0800 840 0313.

Our event, “Pursuing Excellence In Person-centred Care” was held at the House of Lords and hosted by The Viscount Bridgeman, People attending the event discussed how to develop services for people with learning disabilities and mental health needs in order to give them more opportunities to make informed decisions about their care. Three of the people we support attended. You can read their stories here:

Tom

Ben

Sarah

Click here to read more about the event.

Withersfield Lodge


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Withersfield Lodge is a supported living service is situated in the growing town of Haverhill, approximately 1 mile from the town centre and provides

‘Hear All About It’ at Maldon House


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Families of the people we support at our Maldon House service in Seaford, East Sussex, have said how delighted they are with a new monthly bulletin designed to let them share the pleasures and achievements of their family members.

Aziz Hodjaev, Service Manager,, said: “Because the people who live with us all have communications difficulties, they can’t always tell their families what they’ve been up to, but this bulletin is full of news and photos, and tells our stories at a glance.”

The bulletin was the brain-child of support worker Deborah Hastie, who works closely with the people who live at Maldon House to find out which activities they would like each edition to include.

Deborah said: “We do a lot of activities with our service users, so they have plenty to choose from.”

The first issue featured three main stories: an outing to see baby lambs, a walk among the bluebells, and a trip to the seaside.

Deborah said: “We put in some lovely photos of our visit to the Seven Sisters Sheep Centre to see the lambs, sheep, pigs, goats, horses and other animals.

“The people we support wanted to share how much fun they had there, making special mention of the fact that they all got to have a go at feeding the animals and including photos showing this.”

The bulletin also describes a “lovely” long walk in the bluebell woods, followed by tea and cake in a tea-room, and a sunny walk along Seaford beach, with ice-creams.

Aziz said: “It’s so important to the families of those who live with us to share in what’s going on, and the people we support love seeing their activities illustrated like this.

“We do so many fun activities together that we have to be a bit choosy about what to include. We could only give a brief mention to the other things we did like swimming, seeing Jungle Book at the cinema, walks in the Cuckmere Valley and along the bluebell railway, visiting Raystede animal sanctuary, going on pub trips and having baking sessions at home.

“But we did give a special mention to our service user Helen, who was winner of the day when we visited the bowling alley, scoring three strikes and a spare.”

The weekly baking sessions at Maldon House encourage the people who live there to get creative, improve their baking skills and enjoy eating the treats they prepare together, as well as helping these budding chefs develop proficiency in menu-planning, shopping, and money- and time-management.

Aziz said: “My team focuses on supporting people to live a full and active life, becoming more independent and learning new skills.

“Staff are trained in both Makaton sign language and PECs - the brilliant ‘picture exchange communication system’ - which makes it possible for them to communicate with our non-verbal service users.”

Maldon House is run by Regard, the UK’s fourth largest private organisation providing supported living and residential services for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and acquired brain injury.

Specialising in autism and communication strategies, this service currently has one en-suite room available on the ground floor.

Families with an adult with learning difficulties can learn more by calling the Regard referral line: 0800 840 0313.

Maldon House


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Specialism: Adults with a learning disability with a specialism around autism and communication strategies. Staff are trained in both Makaton and PECs.

Challenging Artist Stereotypes at Arcadian Gardens


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A group of local people with learning difficulties and mental health issues are taking part in an exciting project in Haringey that aims to challenge the way people like them are often excluded from the world of art and design.

Public recognition for their work is very important to the artists, three of whom live at our Arcadian Gardens supported living service.

“The people we support are a really talented bunch and we’re so proud of what they’re achieving,” said Arcadian Gardens’ service manager Martin Swift.

“The Creativity 1695 project means they get professional support for their art work and the chance for it to reach a wider audience than it usually would, including exhibitions at London galleries.

“The artists from Arcadian Gardens love the sessions they attend and have produced brilliant works of art ranging from hieroglyph paintings, clay modelling and jewellery projects to animal portraits.”

Creativity 1695 (for people from 16 to 95) was launched two-and-a-half years ago by Vanessa Joseph, a foster carer of two young autistic men.

Works produced are available for sale via the website: www.creativity1695.co.uk, with half the proceeds going to students, half to the project. Sales have generated more than £1,500 to date, with items in the current selection ranging in price from £19.99 to £1,500.

Martin Swift said: “Promoting social inclusivity is central to minimising the disability associated with mental health issues and special needs such as autism, and this is a great way to go about it.”

Some of the other individuals who live at Arcadian Gardens are supported to fulfil work placements on a regular basis, one in the kitchen of the Downhills café run by HAIL (Haringey Association for Independent Living), and another in a telesales centre for a model agency.

Due to the successful transition to independent living of two previous occupants, there are currently two vacancies at the service, offering eligible individuals their own home, n with 24-hour support, and access to a full programme of educational and recreational activities.

Located in Wood Green, North London, Arcadian Gardens is a supported living service focussed on positive outcomes for individuals.

Martin Swift said: “The homes we offer are suitable for anyone moving from residential care or the family home who needs a transition before moving to more independent living environments with outreach support.

“There is an enormous need for this type of accommodation in the area. Many people with learning disabilities reach their 20s and really need to have their own space away from their parents.

“We have a highly trained and experienced staff team who are used to supporting people with learning disability and/or mental health needs, autistic conditions and behaviour that may challenge.”

Families with an adult with learning difficulties can learn more about the opportunity by calling the Regard referral line: 0800 840 0313.

Arcadian Gardens


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Specialism: Learning disability and/or mental health needs, autistic and behaviour that may challenge.

Details of vacancy: A first floor room

Excellence in Person-Centred Care - House of Lords - May 4th, 2016


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“Pursuing Excellence In Person-centred Care” was held at the House of Lords, hosted by The Viscount Bridgeman and organised by Regard, People attending the event discussed how to develop services for people with learning disabilities and mental health needs in order to give them more opportunities to make informed decisions about their care.

Regard Chief Executive, Sandie Foxall-Smith, said: “We put the wishes of the people we support at the centre of everything that we do. Person-centred care is not just about activities, it is about considering people’s desires and aspirations, seeing the person as an individual and being respectful.

“This event was aimed at raising the profile of person-centred care and getting key people together, who are involved in all aspects of care, to discuss how we all need to change, develop and adapt. That includes those with disabilities, those who support them, their families and others who are involved in their care.

“It is all very well to talk about these things in theory but those on the front line need practical strategies. We need to put a person at the heart of their own care, even when they have communications difficulties and find it hard to tell us their needs.”

More than 1,100 people are now cared for by Regard, which has a dedicated staff of over 2,100 people at 147 locations throughout the UK.

Attendees to The House of Lords event discussed how decisions can be shared with individuals so they are helped to manage their own health, finances and lifestyle.

People who use Regard’s services are involved in all aspects of their support, from the recruitment of staff through to day-to-day matters. Staff appreciate how important this responsibility is to service users and how it reflects their desire to make a genuine contribution. Where possible individuals are supported to manage their own finances and health as well as being taught life skills such as road safety and receiving help in finding employment.

For Thomas Coleman, 25, who lives at the Hedera House service, (one of five individuals Regard supports who were invited to the House of Lords event) the evening was particularly special because of his fascination with historic properties and encyclopaedic knowledge of the British monarchy.

Sarah Gilbert, 42, travelled 230-miles from Faerdre in Ceredigion with support worker Caryl Mayes-Davies. Said Caryl: “Sarah has been counting down the days on her sticker-chart. She has had the time of her life and loved every moment.”

Meanwhile, Ben Read, from the Waverly Avenue service in Twickenham, was invited to the function in recognition of the ‘huge progress’ he has made since transitioning to the supported living service from residential care. Ben goes to college twice a week at Hounslow Adult Education in Brentford, and volunteers at Regard’s nearby Kneller Road service where he helps out as part of a Gateway Active Gold Award.

Those attending the event heard about Regard’s Personal Daily Outcomes tool which helps achieve person-centred support every day for individuals in its services. James Kiamtia-Cooper, Head of Behaviour Support at Regard, outlined how positive behaviour tools and strategies can enhance the quality of life for those with challenging behaviour.

Sylvia Zachariah, Registered Specialist with Investors in People, discussed how Regard’s strategy of continuous improvement enabled them to achieve the Gold Standard.

She said of Regard: “Your employees are highly motivated and are fully embracing the person-centred approach, which is the foundation of their work. It is rare that I find a cohort of staff so committed to improving the life of those in their care.”

The management team at Regard will be looking at how future care provision needs to develop in the light of issues raised at the event.

Recruitment open day - 12th May 2016


Join us for our recruitment open day for Support Workers

Click here to download a flyer for me details

To be held on Thursday 12th May 2016 12pm to 8 pm.

At the below address;
Regard
Fenland View
Alexandra Road
WISBECH
PE13 1HQ

For further details contact: katrina.partridge@regard.co.uk or call on 01202 877059 / 07944103711

The team at Park House ‘drive up’ the excitement for Lee on his birthday


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Lee Jones , who lives at Park House in Weymouth, recently celebrated his birthday. He is an enthusiast of commercial vehicles of all types, and in particular Eddie Stobart trucks.

On his birthday the staff planned several surprises for him, the first being a visit to the Eddie Stobart depot at Rugby . He had been talking about wanting to do this but never thought he could because ‘it was too far away from his home’. The second surprise was a local truck company arriving with a truck at his home, and taking him for a ride in it.

Later that week yet another dream of his was realised when he undertook his first driving lesson, although he was very apprehensive and nervous before he went on it he did very well .. so well that he immediately decided to book himself 10 more lessons! We look forward to news of Lee gaining passing his test in the near future. Congratulations to Lee on his achievements so far , and well done to the staff team at Park House for supporting him in doing this.

(update written by Paul, Domcare Dorset)

Stobart fan Lee successfully ‘Parks up’ in Weymouth

A young autistic man who spent the first 19 years of his life in residential care is celebrating the first anniversary of living independently.

Lee Jones, who has high functioning autism and attachment disorder, successfully made the transition to supported living run by Regard, at Park House in Weymouth town centre.

The 20-year-old transport enthusiast, transferred from Purbeck View School in Dorset where he was in residential care.

Park House service manager Elisa Willcox said: “The placement has been a huge success and Lee has adapted to adult services really well. He’s a complete delight.

“He is now involved in selecting what to buy and prepare for evening meals with his fellow house mates. The group are also regular visitors to the local McDonald’s, when they fancy a treat!”

Lee is fascinated by transport and has decorated his room in the famous red, white and green livery of UK transport giants Eddie Stobart.

Since coming to Park House Lee has gone on his first-ever holiday, visiting the National Railway Museum in York with a support worker. He has also attended local steam fairs and the Wessex Truck Show in Yeovil.

Added Elisa: “Lee was very anxious being among people when he arrived at Park House but now gets fully involved when the group join together to prepare an evening meal and supports other service users with reading.

“He attends a nearby friendship group where there are regular discos and trips out and enjoys visiting local cafes and the town library. He also travels to the library independently where he is making great progress with his Read Easy tutor.”

For two days a week Lee attends a nearby community farm where he helps care for the livestock and also drives the tractor and cuts the grass.

Lee now has his own bank account and manages funds with support from his key worker and has a provisional driving licence.

He is also keen on DIY and has his own toolbox. In the future he may look at going to college and eventually look for a job on a farm.

Park House is a specialist supported living service for young people, aged 18-30, with learning disabilities and or autism in transition from residential college, foster care or the family home

The focus of service is to promote independence and support young people to access further education, employment, social and recreational activities.

The service occupies a large semi-detached house within walking distance of the seafront and Weymouth town centre with seven bedrooms, plus communal areas and large garden.

Staff are available 24 hours a day, including a sleep-in night staff member.

There is currently a vacancy at the service, a first floor room with en-suite available. Families and external professionals can learn more by calling a referrals hotline on 0800 840 0313.

Park House


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Specialism: Supported living service for young people with learning disabilities and or autism in transition from residential college, foster care or the family

The people we support at Carew Road love being out in the community


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Thursday cannot come round soon enough for four people who live at a supported living service in Thornton Heath.

The group who all have learning disabilities are weekly visitors to Tenpin Bowling at the Valley Park Leisure Complex in Croydon.

According to Ernestine Dadey, Service Manager at Carew Road, the trip is the highlight of their week.

“They love being out in the community and having fun and being around other people,” said Ernestine.

“It also helps them to keep fit, strengthens and tones muscles and helps ease any stresses in their lives.

“Afterwards they look forward to going for a meal together. This is discussed beforehand each week to decide where they would like to go.”

When the group are not out bowling they enjoy going into Croydon town centre accompanied by their support workers.

Val and Maggie either like to see a film or look around the shops, while David and Ray go to the barbers or for a walk, followed by a trip to the pub.

Meanwhile on Sundays a long walk is usually the order of the day followed by church, then lunch.

“The important thing is to keep their minds active and stimulated which we think is the key to a happy home and a happy life,” added Ernestine.

The group have been at the Carew Road service, run by award-winning care provider Regard, since it opened in 2007.

The property is home to up to five individuals with a learning disability and high levels of vulnerability, supporting them to become more independent in their everyday lives.

For further information visit: www.regard.co.uk or for referrals call: 0800 840 0313.

Carew Road


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Specialism: Learning Disability service.

Age range: 40 plus.

Current Profile of Service: Carew Road can accommodate five people on three

Achieving an “outstanding” takes teamwork


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When faced with the day-to-day challenges of caring for people it can sometimes seem that the service levels needed to achieve an “outstanding” rating from the regulators are an impossible dream.

Regard has put in place its own rigorous audit procedures of services aimed to support them in achieving that “outstanding” rating.

At each of its 147 services the focus is on involving people in decision making about their own care. The in-house auditing system sets rigorous standards which are above those demanded by the Care Quality Commission or the Care and Social Services Inspectorate for Wales.

The recent achievement of a CQC ‘outstanding’ rating for Douglas House in Plymouth, which supports four adult service users with learning disabilities and mental health issues, was made possible through the staff at the service involving those in their care in decisions backed up by quality auditing. Like all of Regard’s services Douglas House puts service users at the heart of the community where they live.

The audit team began its work in 2007 and since then it has become an integral part of Regard’s growth and success as a high quality provider of care services. A bespoke ‘traffic light’ auditing system was introduced in 2014, which sets higher standards and is more rigorous than those required by the CQC, while matching the key lines of enquiry used by them.

Regard’s own auditors visit the localities and give practical feedback, helping those who are in the service day to day to better-address issues that they are sometimes too close to notice. The Quality Team then works with the in-house team to introduce changes.

For instance an audit at Ambleside, Surrey identified a recurring issue over flooring that needed to be adapted to the needs of particular service users. Changes were made improving the quality of life of those who live there.

At Beudygwyn in Wales actions to meet some points raised by local authorities had a negative impact on other areas within the service. A team approach has transformed the service with staff now feeling their work is more effective and that there has been an improvement in the atmosphere of the service.

Amy Jupp, Inspection Manager, Care Quality Commission, East Sussex Coast Team, said: “Outstanding providers achieve high-quality care by managing their resources well. In all the sectors we inspect, there are many examples of excellent leadership – leaders who are visible and who engage widely with people who use services and staff, who promote a strong culture of safety, who put in place robust governance systems and processes, and who plan their resources well.”

Carole Andrews, Head of Social Care Governance at Regard, said: “Our audit process looks at all aspects of compliance – CQC fundamental standards, company policy and procedure, national best practice, and what we have learned as a company within the care sector over the past 20 years.

“This holistic and informed auditing approach adds critical evidence dimensions to the key lines of enquiry used by CQC and has compliance criteria which are aimed at achieving an ‘Outstanding’ inspection rating. Best practice is then circulated within Regard so that everyone learns from each other.

“As a result a service is never left in any doubt as to both external and internal standards and expectations. In the case of Douglas House we were able to evidence continuous improvements through audits.”

Audits are undertaken in ‘real time’ using an iPad and an automatic traffic light is generated at the end of the audit – ‘green’ means no action needed; ‘amber’ for up to 25% of actions generated across the audit; and ‘red’ for over 25% of actions generated across the audit. The electronic audit system automatically sets the timescales for any actions and the auditors give full feedback on what needs to be done before they leave the service.

The auditing team also spend time talking to service users and the staff to ensure ‘what is written on paper’ is translated into high quality support.

Four audits were undertaken at Douglas House over a 12 month period – two Quality audits and two Health and Safety audits with the team looking at all available evidence including service user documents, staff documents, policies and procedures, health and safety checks, medication administration records, accident and incident records, daily recordings, meeting records.

In October 2014 both audits were ‘amber’ with required actions identified. Four consecutive ‘green’ audits were achieved in 2015, followed by a CQC ‘Outstanding’ inspection rating in December 2015.

The inspector praised the safe and caring way that the service was operated and was particularly impressed by the way those who used the service were involved in decision-making about their own care.

The inspector’s report said: “There was a positive culture within the service. There were clear values that included involvement, compassion, dignity, respect and independence. The management team provided strong leadership and led by example.

“People were able to express their opinions and views and were encouraged and supported to have their voice heard. People were included in decisions about the running of the service and staff were encouraged and supported to question practice.”

The team at Regard believe that the formula for an “outstanding” rating is to keep service users’ wishes central to everything while ensuring there is a positive culture among the service team, backed by a strong audit department with real expertise.

Douglas House


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Specialism: Providing bespoke packages of care and support to young adults with a Learning Disability/Mental Health condition, Aspergers/Autism, those with forensic

Regard’s new companywide “whole approach” to PBS training


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Regard has entered into an exciting new training partnership with the Loddon foundation. We are establishing a centre for delivering specialist training as part of our Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) programme for those who deliver services to people who may present challenging behaviour.

The partnership sees Regard work with Loddon Training and Consultancy to deliver the PROACT–SCIPr-UK® programme.

PROACT-SCIPr-UK® stands for Positive Range of Options to Avoid Crisis and Use Therapy – Strategies for Crisis Intervention (revised for the UK) and has its roots in a programme developed in America, which incorporates the founding principles of Gary LaVigna.

James Kiamtia-Cooper, Head of Behaviour Support at Regard, said: “We will be rolling out a programme of training so that every individual who works with someone who might display challenging behaviour will be able to develop techniques that are aimed at prevention rather than intervention.

“An important part of this relationship will be working together with Loddon to develop resources that we can share with others in the care industry, promoting best practice.”

The training will be accredited under the British Institute of Learning Disabilities and is aimed at providing those who work within Regard with safe techniques for protectively supporting individuals who display challenging and aggressive behaviour.

Said James Kiamtia-Cooper: “We are supporting those in our care to develop lifelong skills that enhance their quality of life. We want to minimise the use of physical intervention. Often people’s behaviour results from not being able to communicate their wants and needs. Safe and constant support is the key.

“Our aim is to enhance people’s quality of life by staff being trained in proactive and positive techniques for working and communicating with individuals who at times may be challenging. Teaching life skills and coping strategies to the people we support is our goal here at Regard.”

Mr Kiamtia-Cooper is scheme co-ordinator and is leading a team of four principal instructors. They are working to develop an in-house team of 45 qualified instructors within Regard as part of the organisation’s Positive Behaviour Support programme.

The company-wide approach will see the programme rolled out throughout England and Wales over the next six years.

Jodie takes independence in her stride at Chinook


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Jodie, who has Down’s syndrome, is celebrating making the successful transition from leaving home to leading an independent life following her move into our Chinook supported living service..

According to Jodie’s mum Maria Beach, Jodie has taken the move to a new home in her stride and is enjoying every minute.

“It’s been a really smooth transition for Jodie and we are so pleased for her. You can see her confidence growing daily,” said Maria.“She is only living 10-doors down but it is a different environment and she is getting more and more independent as time goes on.The house feels very quiet without her but we know she’s in good hands. The staff at Chinook are so friendly and supportive. As a family we are very much part of the local community in Lydd and it’s wonderful that Jodie can continue to be part of that.”

Jodie has been coming to Chinook twice a week to a day service for two years and is already friends with her fellow house mates.

On Wednesdays Jodie works at the Coterie Tea Room at the Mariners in Rye which offers training opportunities for adults with learning disabilities.“It really gives her a sense of purpose,” added Maria. “We have always tried to impress upon her the importance of working and putting something back.” Jodie is shortly set to receive a City & Guilds catering certificate from the Canterbury Oast Trust who runs the Mariners.

Meanwhile on Mondays and Tuesdays she attends The Shed day centre in Hythe which provides in-house activities and regular trips into the community.Chinook manager Joan-Ann Dartnell said: “It’s a delight to see Jodie settling in so well. She really seems to be thriving in her new home.” When she’s not out and about Jodie enjoys playing on her Karaoke machine and likes to meet up with her brothers Josh and Harry.

Jodie is one of seven individuals who live at Chinook which provides 24-hour staffing support to help people live as independently as possible. People who live at the service are involved in the day to day running of their home from deciding menus, shopping and cooking to laundry and gardening. Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest care provider and holds a prestigious Gold Investors in People standard.

For further information visit: www.regard.co.uk or for referrals call: 0800 840 0313.

Chinook


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Specialism: Adults with a learning disability, autism, and mental health needs.

Details of Vacancy: There are no current vacancies.

Our new service at Bishop’s House was developed to meet local requirements


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Bishop’s House is made up of six self-contained flats and has been developed in consultation with local authorities including King’s Lynn & West Norfolk borough council, identifying the needs of people with care requirements in the area.

“There is a shortage of this kind of accommodation in the town where people with specific care needs are able to live as part of the community,” said Regard locality manager Sue Mace.“We are dedicated to supporting people to live independently and to develop their daily living skills with the aim of helping them to become more confident and self-sufficient. The property is in the heart of the King’s Lynn amid the hustle and the bustle, so the people who live here will not feel isolated and can enjoy being part of everything the town has to offer.They will have access to further education, employment, social and recreational activities in the area; and being near to other Regard services means there is additional support if necessary.”

Two individuals who live in Regard’s nearby Mill House residential service are poised to move into the new service as the next stage to gaining true independence.

Bishop’s House is close to St James leisure centre where service users can be supported to use the facilities on offer including gyms, saunas and access to sports parks for more specific training.

The flats, which include ground floor options for people with mobility issues, each have their own bathroom, kitchen, lounge/diner and can be individually- tailored to meet specific needs.

Regard is recruiting up to 10 support workers to provide support to individuals within the Bishop’s House service and is looking for people who have NVQ 2 qualifications and above.

“We are looking for people who live in the area and who will offer a long-term commitment to the people they support,” added Sue.

Regard has plans to develop further services based in the area based on local need. It believes supported living is a key part in the pathway for people to be able to move on from residential care to true independence with a package of support tailored to them.

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest care provider and was recently awarded the prestigious Gold Investors in People standard.

For further information contact Sue Mace at: Sue.Mace@regard.co.uk or call the referrals hotline on: 0800 840 0313.

Bishop’s House


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Specialism: The service supports adults with enduring Mental Health needs or Learning Difficulties, Asperger’s, Autism or ABI who would benefit from living

Regard CEO, Sandie Foxall-Smith is shortlisted for a prestigious Investors in People Award 2016


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Sandie Foxall-Smith, CEO Regard, has been shortlisted for Leader of the year in the global Investors in People Awards.

The category, for leaders in businesses with over 250 employees, recognises inspirational leadership that stands out above the rest.

The Awards, which received over 300 entries internationally, celebrate the best people management practices among Investors in People-accredited businesses.

Sandie, who joined Regard in 2012, was shortlisted for her achievements which included ‘a demonstrable track record of delivering results for the organisation’ and for being a ‘leader who is decisive and gives clear direction for people.”

“It is a privilege to be shortlisted for this prestigious award, a clear indication of the dedication and hard work the team has invested in the business,” said Sandie.

“Once management is right everyone is able to work together to achieve goals and improve things for the most important people - those we care for through our service.

“By creating a culture of innovation through team-working we have created the desire among our staff to be the best in care delivery.”

Under Sandie’s leadership Regard has been transformed into the fourth largest provider in the sector with 147 residential care and supported living services across the country for people with learning disabilities and mental health needs.

Paul Devoy, head of Investors in People, said: “Once again we have been overwhelmed by the number and calibre of entries received for the Investors in People Awards.

“It’s fantastic to see so many organisations nominated for outperforming in their sector, demonstrating great people management practice and a commitment to staff development.”

The systems Sandie and her team have instigated led to IIP Bronze, Silver and Gold awards in just three years, and a clutch of industry awards.

Winners are announced at a spectacular awards ceremony and dinner in June 2016 at Old Billingsgate, London.

Cracking designs for Easter egg hunt at Cerrig Camu


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Individuals who live at our specialist residential care home in Dolgellau are gearing up for their annual Easter egg hunt.

The group who live at the Cerrig Camu service in Old Barmouth Road are busy putting together egg designs for the Easter Sunday event.

They attend the nearby Outcomes with Learning centre which offers activities including arts and crafts, animal husbandry, and horticulture.

They also support individuals to develop independent living skills as part of a pathway to more independent living.

Cerrig Camu manager Andrew Papirnyk said: “It’s great to see people coming up with such wonderful creations for the Easter egg hunt.

“The group are now putting their designs into practice and making eggs out of card, papier mâché, tissue paper and of course, chocolate.

“Everyone is looking forward the event, which promises to be fun for everyone.”

Cerrig Camu, run by award-winning care provider Regard, is an old manor house, parts of which date back to 1596, with 11 acres of grounds.

The large main house has recently been completely refurbished to be able to provide support within smaller shared-environments within the building.

As a result of these works they now have a four bed en-suite flat along with a three bed en-suite flat newly available.

There are also three further cottages in the grounds where individuals can live supported by staff team members.

Cerrig Camu, formerly known as Dolryhd, was built by Griffith Nanney of Nannau, whose family had been seated in Merioneth since the 13th century and who was elected to Parliament in 1593.

The building still retains many of the original features and character.

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest care provider and holds a prestigious Gold Investors in People standard.

For further information, click below or for referrals call: 0800 840 0313.

Cerrig Camu Residential Service


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Pioneering scheme success at Harwich House in Littlehampton


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Amy who lives at Harwich House in Littlehampton is benefiting from a pioneering new way of supporting people with autism and complex needs to live a more independent life.

Four months ago, Amy Scott, found it difficult to leave the residential home where she lives because any changes to her daily routine caused enormous anxiety.

Now the 29-year-old, who has autism and a learning disability, goes shopping once a week in Littlehampton, makes regular trips to her local library and hopes to take a course at Northbrook College.

Amy’s new-found confidence coincides with the service introducing a ‘Personal Daily Outcomes’ model – a database designed to identify individuals’ health, behaviour, personal care, skills teaching and development needs.

Said Harwich House deputy manager, Jean Danby: “The database is helping us to capture details of approaches that are likely to work with individuals like Amy who are in our care.

“It means on a daily basis we can gather and cross-check information, record consistency or changes in an individual’s wants/needs and note any progress made. It also helps identify any regulatory and training needs.

“Information is easy to collate and analyse and means we can make any adaptations necessary when a person’s independence increases.

“Amy’s mother has told us she has noticed a real change in her daughter’s confidence levels and says she is much happier now.”

The ‘Personal Daily Outcomes’ model has been developed by care provider Regard, who run Harwich House, and is being rolled out across the company’s 147 residential and supported living services across the country.

Added Jean: “Now, no matter how complex a person’s disability, using Personal Daily Outcomes we are much better equipped to monitor the people who live with us and chart their progress towards greater independence.

Along with her housemates, Harry Potter fan Amy, is involved in the day-to-day running of the house, and is supported to draw up menus, grocery shopping, preparing and cooking the evening meal.

Jean Danby says learning new skills has improved Amy’s ability to concentrate and has given her a sense of purpose and fulfilment which has helped reduce her anxiety levels.

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest private provider of supported living and specialist residential services in the UK for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and Acquired Brain Injury.

Further details are available from www.regard.co.uk or call 0208 255 4433.

Harwich House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Beudygwyn Farm looking ahead to harvest promise


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Individuals living at our Beudygwyn service, near Anglesey, are looking ahead to enjoying some delicious summer salads after preparing some raised beds for spring planting.

John Donlevy and staff member Jon Williams who live at Beudygwyn Farm at Carreglefn, Amlwch, have been wielding their gardening forks and turning over the soil and digging in organic fertiliser in the service’s new polytunnel.

Said service manager Gwenda Potter: “We are quite exposed up here but with the polytunnel we’re sheltered from the worst of the weather, so when it’s cold and wet outdoors it’s pleasantly warm inside.

“It means we can make an early start with our planting and steal a march on nature. We are looking forward to tucking into a harvest of delicious tomatoes, cucumbers, aubergines and lettuce once summer comes.

“For the people who live here it gives them experience of gardening and an idea of the range of things they are able to grow. To watch something develop from a seed or a small plant into an edible crop is so rewarding.”

Beudygwyn Farm is an all male service run by award-winning care provider Regard, provides support for up to 14 people with moderate learning disabilities, mental health needs, complex and challenging behaviour and physical disabilities.

The main house is registered for three service users with a further 11 beds in four cottages in the grounds of the farm, including a self-contained flat suitable for a service user who needs rehabilitation training to move from residential care to a more independent setting.

The service is in the unusual position of having a vacancy currently in one of the bungalows.

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest care provider and holds a prestigious Gold Investors in People standard.

For further information visit: www.regard.co.uk or for referrals call: 0800 840 0313.

Beudygwyn Farm


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Recruitment Event, 18th - 19th March, Excel, London


Visit us on Stand 402 at the Capital Talent Recruitment Event, Excel, London, on 18th and 19th March to discuss career opportunities.

A touching homage to sensory charity at The Uplands


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Staff at our Uplands service have been inspired to create its own sensory room and garden for one of the people they care for.

Chrissie, who is severely disabled and has a bi-polar disorder, regularly visits the Touch Trust sensory suite at the Wales Millennium Centre.

She gets so much from her sessions that staff at The Uplands care service where she lives have created a sensory room for her to use.

The space has been decorated with fibre optic lighting, with tranquil mood- music, stress-balls, lava lamps and sensory fabrics.

Outside the room opens out into a garden, planted with textural foliage, herbs and sweet-smelling flowers.

Uplands service manager Ann Peebles said: “Touch Trust is such an inspiring place we wanted to emulate some of the things they do.

“Chrissie absolutely loves the sensory room. It is an oasis of calm and an area where she can just come and relax and enjoy the sensory experience.

“It might seem to be all about fun but it actually goes much deeper than that and has an impact on her physical, emotional and social development.”

Touch Trust helps improve the lives of people affected by autism and profound and multiple disabilities using a holistic sensory programme

The charity helps 250 people with severe disabilities at its Millennium Centre base as well hundreds more at day and care centres.

Uplands looks over the Ebbw Valley and is home for up to four service users with learning disabilities or mental health needs and complex needs.

Uplands House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Space to live in converted windmill at Sail Close


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Our supported living service in a converted windmill in Gayton, near King’s Lynn, Norfolk has been so successful that it will soon have vacancies for individuals with mental health needs and learning disabilities as some of the current people move on to live more independent lives.

Sail Close is a supported living service for people with learning disabilities. All apartments have their own front doors, separate living space and bedrooms, as well as fully fitted kitchens and bathrooms. There is 24-hour support from staff based on care plans.

Gemma Watson, who leads the team at Sail Close, said: “A few of people are ready for the move into more independent accommodation. We also have people moving into their own homes, called MyHomes, and others are moving to Regard’s new supported living service in King’s Lynn.

“Our aim is to give people the individual support they need in their daily lives. That may take the form of prompts and encouragement to carry out cleaning and other domestic tasks, or to take medication or managing money.

“We want the tenants to develop the skills they need to live life independently so it is always exciting when they are able to move on to new accommodation. We have tenants aged from 21 up to 76 so the vacancies really will suit anyone.

“It may be particularly helpful for someone with learning disabilities or mental health needs who has lived at home with parents for many years or is coming from a residential college and is now ready to live on their own in a safe and supported environment.”

Sail Close includes a communal courtyard and garden where tenants can socialise and have barbeques. The former mill building includes a communal room with a pool table that can be used for socialising and meetings.

For details of the vacancies contact the Regard referrals hotline on: 0800 840 0313.

Sail Close


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Specialism: Regard will provide a bespoke care plan for each individual based on their own needs through a considered assessment and discharge process.

Douglas House bowled over by “Outstanding” rating


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Our team at Douglas House celebrated with a game of ten-pin bowling after hearing that the service they live and work in had been rated “outstanding” by the Care Quality Commission.

Four adults, who have learning disability and associated conditions such as Asperger’s and autism live in Douglas House in Restormel Terrace, Mutley, Plymouth.

The inspectors praised the way the group are able to express their views and have their voices heard and the same philosophy went into the celebrations with the four service users deciding on the nature of the celebration.

George, Samuel, Mark and James who live in Douglas House are encouraged to achieve their goals even though they sometimes have communication difficulties.

They all play an active part in the local community with George regularly visiting the local library to use the internet. All of the group are encouraged to manage their own finances at the local bank.

Through Plymouth People First Samuel has trained as a fire warden. He also volunteers at the local food bank. James achieved a Road Safety Ambassador Award also through Plymouth People First, part of Plymouth Highbury Trust and has carried out voluntary work at a local charity shop.

Douglas House is supporting other services run by Regard in the area in their aim to also achieve “outstanding” status. Monthly advocacy meetings are held at Douglas House with vulnerable adults from Victoria and Grenville houses in Victoria Terrace, Plymouth attending and nearby Restormel House.

Manager at Douglas House Lisa Runnalls said: “We are so proud of the achievement as we understand that only one per cent of services that provide care and accommodation of our type get the accolade of ‘outstanding’.

“We are working hard in the local community and with other services in Plymouth to ensure the best for those who live here and others locally with learning disabilities.

“The staff work closely with those who live here to support them in their goals and everyone enjoyed a great time 10-pin bowling. The rating has encouraged us to continue making improvements and helping those who live here have a fulfilled life.”

Douglas House


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Specialism: Providing bespoke packages of care and support to young adults with a Learning Disability/Mental Health condition, Aspergers/Autism, those with forensic

Victoria and Grenville


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Specialism: This service is specifically dedicated to providing support to adults who are vulnerable and have a learning disability, Mental Health Issues, Challenging

Restormel House


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Specialism: Learning Disabilities, Mental Health issues and other concurrent complex needs. Individuals with Asperger’s and/or other Autistic spectrum conditions and Individuals

“Outstanding” care at Douglas House in Plymouth


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Our Douglas House residential service has been given an “outstanding” rating following an unannounced inspection by the Care Quality Commission.

The inspector’s report said that the people living in Douglas House were very proud of their home and spoke in a way that suggested a sense of belonging and contentment. One person told the inspector: “I love it here. It is luxury.”

The inspector praised the safe and caring way that the service was operated and was particularly impressed by the way those who used the service were involved in decision-making about their own care.

The inspector’s report said: “There was a positive culture within the service. There were clear values that included involvement, compassion, dignity, respect and independence. The management team provided strong leadership and led by example.

“People were able to express their opinions and views and were encouraged and supported to have their voice heard. People were included in decisions about the running of the service and staff were encouraged and supported to question practice.”

Manager at Douglas House Lisa Runnalls said: “We are very proud to have received this rating from the Care Quality Commission , which looked into all aspects of Douglas House. It is particularly pleasing to see the lovely comments to the inspectors by those we care for and their families as they are the people who really matter and are at the heart of everything we do.

“It is a great tribute to all the staff who work so hard every day to make a difference in the lives of those who live at Douglas House. It has encouraged us to continue to explore and develop ways to support people.”

Douglas House, which provides care and accommodation for up to four people joins only one per cent of adult social care services in the UK that achieved “outstanding” rating from the CQC in 2015.

Douglas House


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Specialism: Providing bespoke packages of care and support to young adults with a Learning Disability/Mental Health condition, Aspergers/Autism, those with forensic

Regard is shortlisted as ‘Best Employer’ in Skills for Care accolades


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We are excited to be a Skills for Care finalist in their 2016 Accolades Awards which reward adult social care organisations for their commitment to delivering high quality care and developing their workforce

Now in its 13th year, the Accolades finalists shortlist is an eclectic mix of employers, training providers, local authorities and individual employers who have all demonstrated an innovative approach to developing learning and development opportunities for the 1.5m strong adult social care workforce in England.

Regard, who have been named as one of only four finalists in the category Best Employer Of Over 250 Staff, is the country’s fourth biggest private provider of care homes and supported living services.

Founded in 1994, the organisation has its headquarters in Kingston-upon-Thames and employs around 2,000 direct care staff to support over 1,000 service users with learning disabilities, mental health needs or acquired brain injuries at over 145 services nationwide.

Regard’s CEO, Sandie Foxall-Smith, said: “These Accolades provide an independent endorsement of the quality of the service we deliver and we’re delighted to have been selected as finalists, just a few months after receiving our Investors In People Gold accreditation.

“Being shortlisted in the Best Employer category proves that Regard pursues a planned and effective approach to developing a skilled and knowledgeable workforce, and recognises our role as champions of the personalised approach to social care services.”

Skills for Care CEO Sharon Allen said: “All the Accolades finalists are outstanding examples of how we can make sure highly motivated care and support workers can develop their skills and knowledge which leads to high quality care and support for people in our communities.

“It is also a chance in the continuing tough financial environment for us to share knowledge of how we can find, retain and train people with the right values to meet increasing demand for care and support so everyone who needs it can access truly person centred care.”

Regard will join the other finalists to discover whether they have won an Accolade at the prestigious annual awards ceremony in Birmingham on Thursday 10 March 2016.

Click here to find out more about working for Regard.

ABBA Tribute to celebrate life of Ashford Lodge’s Mark Watts


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The life of Mark, who had Down’s Syndrome and died before his 60th birthday has been celebrated by family and the friends with an Abba-themed party in his honour.

Mark, an avid Crystal Palace fan, who lived at Ashford Lodge residential home for nine years was described by the service manager, Natasha Lewis as a “lovely, kind, generous man with a lot of character.”

The Abba party was originally planned for Mark’s 60th birthday, with guests wearing Abba-themed fancy dress and music by the iconic Swedish pop group. His family not only agreed that it should go ahead this month as planned, as a celebration of Mark’s life, they also went to Ashford Lodge and joined in.

Mark died last September in hospital with a heart valve failure. Senior service worker Mandy Dodd created a floral tribute Crystal Palace shirt in silk flowers, with Mark’s name in the middle for his funeral.

While at Ashford Lodge he was supported to attend regular classes at Elham Valley College where he enjoyed woodwork and indoor gardening for many years, as well as the coffee and the company of fellow students.

Natasha Lewis said: “His family have kept the lovely wooden walking stick Mark made for himself at the college, in memory of him.

“People have been enquiring about him, because he was a familiar figure in our local community, and he will be greatly missed by his family and his many friends in the village, at the college and at Ashford Lodge.”

A regular at mens’ nights at Chilham’s Woolpack Inn, Mark loved being involved in community life and going on outings.

In the summer staff from his residential service delighted him with a surprise visit to a Crystal Palace home match, complete with picnic lunch and a tour of the Selhurst Park ground.

Mark first arrived at Ashford Lodge as an emergency temporary placement in 2007, at which time he was unable to leave his bed.

A personal care package devised and delivered by the team at Ashford Lodge helped restore Mark to health, and with much support and encouragement from his support workers and a bespoke development programme, he was able to live life to the full.

Ashford Lodge


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Specialism: Adults with learning disabilities who may also have complex needs and behaviours that are challenging.

Type of Service: 24 hour supported

We respond to local authority need at Arundel House


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Essex County Council has identified older adults in Frinton-On-Sea living with learning difficulties and physical or complex health needs as the group most in need of suitable accommodation with care-providers in the town.

So great is this need that when a room becomes vacant shortly at Arundel House in Harold Road we have been asked to focus on catering to the needs of the over-35 age group.

Service manager Pat Ward and the team at Arundel House have done such a successful job in supporting its youngest service user Samantha, aged 26, that she is now able to relocate to Colchester where she will be supported to live independently in a flat close to her family.

Service manager Pat Ward said: “We shall miss Samantha, who has lived with us since she left school in 2009, but it’s great that we’ve been able to support her to develop her independent living skills to the extent that she is capable of moving out.

“The Council have now asked if we will focus on the needs of older people in Frinton – which is a good fit with our remaining service users – because there is such high demand in the town for the service we can provide.”

Most Arundel House residents have enduring health needs – including some with the early onset dementia often associated with a learning disability – and this makes independent living very unlikely for them.

However Pat and her team are keen to support their service users to live life to the full, and they regularly participate in activities such as sailing, golf and cycling. One of the people they support, Joe (pictured above) recently visited Auschwitz.

Meanwhile at home everyone is encouraged to be involved in the way Arundel House is run, through weekly menu-planning meetings, monthly residents’ meetings and involvement in regular health and safety committee meetings.

Pat Ward explained how each service user is encouraged to choose their own keyworker, who will spend time with them to help them achieve their goals and aspirations.

“Together they plan a package of care designed to meet their needs and wishes,” said Pat.

“Despite our service users’ high health needs, we focus strongly on supporting the people who live with us to develop their independence skills and have the best possible quality of life.”

The forthcoming vacancy is in a first floor en-suite bedroom, and a lift is currently being installed to improve accessibility.

The service, which accommodates ten people, occupies a large detached house with two dining rooms, a large lounge, a visitors’ room and a fully enclosed garden with a swing and a log cabin that can also be used as a sensory room.

Families and external professionals can learn more about the vacancy by calling a referrals hotline on 0800 840 0313.

Arundel House


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We are holding an event in July for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Our partnership with Slough Borough Council delivers success at Thames House


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Savings to the adult social care budget is just one of the benefits of our partnership with Slough Borough Council’s commissioning team, with no compromise at all on the positive outcomes for the individuals with learning disabilities we support.

Thames House in Burnham is the outcome of a project to develop a high-quality supported living service based on the needs of individuals, which the Regard developed in partnership with Slough in the second half of 2015.

The team from Regard has worked closely with Paul Cooper and his commissioning team to develop the new service in a proactive manner which is being hailed by other purchasing authorities as the way forward with such projects.

Guy Page, Regard’s Head of Communications said: “Paul Cooper and his team provided an outstanding example of very positive joined-up commissioning, with absolute clarity regarding Slough Borough Council’s expectations and outcomes as my organisation worked towards establishing a new supported living service for individuals with learning disabilities and mental health needs in Slough during the past year.

“In developing the necessary framework agreement, we met with none of the obstacles which can sometimes delay such projects – Paul and his team continued working co-operatively with us throughout to maintain the project’s momentum.

“They also provided invaluable advice on aspects of refurbishment so that we could ensure the new service would reflect identified local needs.”

As a result of this effective partnership working, when Thames House opened in May 2015 three of the available six rooms were immediately filled, with a further two becoming occupied within the following month with the final room filled shortly after.

Paul Cooper said: “Experience indicates that such rapid occupation is uncommon - an extraordinary result in a short space of time, due in no small part to joint project meetings where we worked together to identify potential service users.”

The initial success of Thames House has put Regard in a position where the organisation is already able to start working towards the establishment of another service in the locality which is due to open in March 2016.

The service occupies a large detached house within walking distance of the local shops and amenities in Burnham and good transport links to the wider area.

The focus of the service is promoting independence and supporting people to access further education, employment, social and recreational activities. Each individual is supported individually to develop their budgeting skills and to become more independent in all areas of their lives.

Given the level of demand for its services, Regard wishes to recruit more staff and is urging local people to consider working in the care sector.

Ruth Daly who leads the care team in Slough said: “There are tremendous career opportunities in the care sector for people who have the desire to really make a difference to the lives of others.

“No-one would describe what we do as ‘easy’ but it can be incredibly rewarding.

“Care offers interesting and challenging opportunities, and attracts people from a variety of backgrounds. The most important characteristic of a good carer is having genuine passion for what they do.”

To ensure that appointments to all positions are the right ones, Regard has developed a detailed criteria for each role and interview questions that probe applicants’ aptitude and attitude towards work in the health and social care sector.

Job induction includes two weeks of shadowing to build the confidence of new recruits, plus mandatory and service-specific training.

For further details please contact Ruth on 07944 130777 or via email Thames.House@Regard.co.uk

Families with an adult with learning difficulties can learn more about the available accommodation by calling the Regard referral line: 0800 840 0313.

Regard, the UK’s fourth biggest care provider, has just been awarded the prestigious Gold Investors In People standard - one of just four out of the 17,000 care organisations in the country to have achieved this status.

Thames House


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Specialism: Supported living service for people with learning disabilities with a focus on developing further independent skills.

Details of Vacancy: There

Caeronnen - our new service for people with disabilities in Ceredigion


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Our new supported living service for adults with an autistic spectrum disorder and learning difficulties, mental health issues and acquired brain injury is opening in Ceredigion, creating over 20 new jobs for the local community.

We have converted a bungalow and annex to create the new Caeronnen service, which will cater for between four and six people in two three-bed, self-contained units in spacious grounds.

Regard, newly announced Wales Care Awards ‘Gold’ winners, have been in consultation with local authorities, including Ceredigion County Council, regarding identifying the needs of individuals in the area.

“There is an enormous need for this type of accommodation,” said customer relationship manager, Mary Newton. “We’re offering a chance for people to live independent lives with access to the level of support they need.

“We can provide individuals with complex needs with their own team for consistency and development of quality relationships. There will be 24-hour background staffing, including shared waking nights.

“We aim to work with the people who live at our services to encourage the development of life skills and support them to integrate within the wider community.”

The two units all have 3 bedrooms and each have their own bathroom, kitchen, lounge/diner and can be individually tailored to meet people’s specific needs.

Caeronnen is set in the beautiful Llangrannog countryside. The area is well-known across Wales for the annual Urdd, the Welsh League of Hope movement, meeting.

Regard is looking to recruit over 20 support workers to provide support to individuals within the service and are looking for people who have NVQ 2 qualifications and above.

“We are looking for people who live in the area and who will offer a long-term commitment to the people they support,” added Mary.

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest care provider and was recently awarded the prestigious Gold Investors in People standard.

For further information about the Caeronnen contact: Mary Newton at: Mary.Newton@regard.co.uk or call: 07913 403 637.

Caeronnen


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Specialism: The service supports adults with Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Learning Difficulties, Mental Health, or ABI, substance misuse issues or with a history of

College girl Pauline comes into her own at Inglewood House


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Staff at Inglewood House are celebrating the growing confidence of one of the people who lives there who is flourishing. Pauline Cooper, who has a moderate learning disability and a mental health condition, is looking forward to 2016 with renewed self-belief.

Liz Hayes, manager of Inglewood House, says 47 year old Pauline is thriving at the service and regularly attends a nearby college. “It’s taken a long, long time to get Pauline to the place she’s at today. She now gets up and goes to college which is something she would never have entertained before. Because of difficulties she has faced in life, she had no confidence but I’m glad to say she’s now really starting to come into her own. She now understands there are good people out there and the world can be a wonderful, exciting place to be. Her medication is slowly being reduced and her mental health has been very stable for quite some time now.”

Pauline is accompanied by staff from the service to and from France Hill College each day. She now has the confidence to attend classes on her own and to meet up with friends in the college café. Pauline, who has lived at the home since 1994, studies art and independent living skills. Liz Hayes believes low staff turn-over at the service and the endless patience of support workers is the secret of their success. “The property is in an ordinary street and the people who live here are part of the community. Many have come to us from institutions and it takes a long time for them to emerge from their shell and to grow in confidence. Pauline loves being pampered and having her nails and make-up done which we do for her. She loves to look nice and takes a lot of care over her appearance. She adores clothes shopping and we go with her and help her choose her outfits.” Staff even support Pauline to dye her trade-mark bright red hair every six weeks.

Inglewood House is home to up to 11 adults with a learning disability, and accompanying diagnosis such as epilepsy, dementia and complex physical needs. Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest private provider of supported living and specialist residential services in the UK for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and acquired brain Injury. Further details are available from www.regard.co.uk or call 0208 255 4433.

Inglewood House


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Learning animal husbandry skills at Highdowns gives a sense of purpose


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A rural service for people with learning disabilities in Cornwall is learning animal husbandry skills by helping preserve a rare breed of sheep.

Individuals who live at Highdowns farm near Camborne look after a small stock of Ryeland rams, a breed that dates back 700 years.

Highdowns is home to up to 14 people with learning disabilities, mental health issues and parallel complex needs.

Manager Jenna Betts says the Ryelands have had a major impact on the people who live in the four properties on the 10-acre site.

“They have responsibility for putting sheep out in the morning, feeding them and providing them with clean water and putting them to bed in the barn.

“We find it gives them a real sense of purpose. They are also gaining valuable animal husbandry and farming skills while working out in the fresh air.

“The animals are small, docile and ideal for small sites and easy on fences compared with many sheep breeds.”

Ryeland sheep were first introduced at Highdowns in 2013 when the former farm was brought back into service.

The rams are registered as Highdowns stock with the Ryeland Flock Book Society and are exhibited at local agricultural shows.

In addition to sheep, Highdowns boasts 40 ducks, numerous rabbits and two peacocks and one peahen and sells eggs laid by the farm’s free range chickens.

The farm also has a polytunnel where people who live on the farm will be growing their own fruit and vegetables which they hope to sell.

Ryeland sheep are among the oldest established British sheep breeds and are believed to be derived from the Spanish Merino.

Queen Elizabeth I was reputedly a fan of Ryeland wool. A pair of stockings given her as a gift pleased her so much she swore from then on she would only wear clothing woven from their fleece.

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest private provider of supported living and specialist residential services in the UK for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and acquired brain injury.

Highdowns


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Specialism: Learning Disabilities, Mental Health issues and other concurrent complex needs. Individuals with Asperger’s and/or other Autistic spectrum conditions and Individuals

Opportunities to join our team in Lincolnshire


Katrina Greff Locality Manager for Regard is appealing to local people considering a new job for the New Year to think about opportunities in the care sector.

Regard specialises in supporting people with learning disability in their own homes in Lincolnshire with new services being opened in the Holbeach area.

Katrina said: “There are tremendous career opportunities in the care sector for people who have the desire to really make a difference to the lives of others.

“No-one would describe what we do as ‘easy’ but it can be incredibly rewarding. Care offers interesting and challenging opportunities, and attracts people from a variety of backgrounds.

The most important characteristic of a good support worker is having genuine passion for what they do.”

Regard places great emphasis on supporting people to achieve their goals and lifelong dreams which they may have not had the opportunity to experience before. This includes supporting people to have their own home for the first time, attend college and get a job and to go on holiday.

The Regard group, the UK’s fourth biggest provider of care homes and supported living services, who recently received a Gold Investors in People award ensure that staff and service users are listened to and their suggestions and ideas are actioned. To ensure that appointments to all positions are the right ones, Regard has developed a detailed criteria for each role and interview questions that probe applicants’ aptitude and attitude towards work in the health and social care sector.

Job induction includes shadowing to build the confidence of new recruits, plus mandatory and service-specific training.

For further details on this role, please contact Katrina Partridge, on 01202877059 / 07944 103711 or via email on Katrina.partridge@regard.co.uk

Christmas Jumper day & Text Santa


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Christmas jumper day!

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from all at the Kingston office!

Helping raise £31 for text Santa - well done all!

New job for the new year at Ivers House


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Gina, Manager at Ivers House is appealing to local people considering a new job for the New Year to think about opportunities in the care sector.

Ivers House specialises in supporting people with autism on a farm environment in the village of Marnhull near Shaftesbury.

Gina said: “There are tremendous career opportunities in the care sector for people who have the desire to really make a difference to the lives of others.

“No-one would describe what we do as ‘easy’ but it can be incredibly rewarding. Care offers interesting and challenging opportunities, and attracts people from a variety of backgrounds. The most important characteristic of a good carer is having genuine passion for what they do.”

Support worker Mike Smith, who joined the team at Ivers House nearly two years ago, started his working life first in banking, then in retail, but says that caring is the perfect job for him.

Mike said: “I live within five minutes’ walk from Ivers, but if I had to commute to work here, I would. Ivers is the most impeccably-run service I’ve come across in 20 years in the industry, and provides a real home-from-home for the people who live there.

“When potential new staff are interviewed and selected, the service users at Ivers House are involved, which is what gives our team its ‘extended-family’ character.”

Applicants are guaranteed an interview, attended by two staff and a service user, and all decisions reached regarding recruitment are mutually agreed by service users and managers.

The service has a broad age range of staff, including some in their seventies who are not planning on having a quiet life anytime soon.

Mike said: “We have an ongoing charity fund-raising programme which has include runs, walks, skydives, with both staff and service users being involved. Everyone who works here says their job is amazing as it doesn’t feel like work and it’s a pleasure to support such amazing individuals.”

Ivers House places great emphasis on total communication for people who are non-verbal, and staff work hard to make learning and communication fun. They also support individuals on holidays from narrow boats to activity challenges.

The service operates a popular programme of activities on its four-acre farm site, such as looking after its large kitchen garden and caring for the resident alpaca, goats, chickens and rabbits, and staff also support service users to take part in community activities such as recycling projects, tending the gardens of the doctor’s surgery and working in charity shops and the garden centre.

Ivers House is run by ACH, part of the Regard group, the UK’s fourth biggest provider of care homes and supported living services, who recently received a Gold Investors in People award.

To ensure that appointments to all positions are the right ones, Regard has developed a detailed criteria for each role and interview questions that probe applicants’ aptitude and attitude towards work in the health and social care sector.

Job induction includes two weeks of shadowing to build the confidence of new recruits, plus mandatory and service-specific training.

Ivers House was nominated by staff for the ‘Best Place to Work’ award in the last Blackmore Vale Business Awards, and service manager Gina Markham was shortlisted in the category of ‘Best Employee.’ The established staff team numbers more than 60, many of whom have been in post more than a decade.

For further details on this role, please contact Gina Markham, on 01258 820164 via email on gina.markham@achuk.com

Ivers House


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We are holding an event in July for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Rhiba’s got Christmas in the bag at Strathnairn


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A Cardiff woman who uses art to help her manage a mental health condition has created a line of Christmas accessories.

Rhiba Rendell, who lives in a supported living service in Roath, has crafted a series of exquisite gift bags, cards and knitted baby wear.

Talented Rhiba, whose art work was recently on show at the Gate Gallery in Keppoch Street, says Christmas is her favourite time of year.

Said Rhiba: “I set myself a challenge this Christmas and I’m really thrilled with what I’ve managed to produce.

“I’ve enjoyed every minute. I find working on art and craft projects really therapeutic and I’ve had some lovely compliments.”

Rhiba is being supported to live an independent life at the Strathnairn service run by award-winning care provider Regard.

The 43-year-old has an A Level in art and began a foundation course to further her study, but has had to take a break because of her condition.

Service manager Kelly Prosser said: “We are constantly amazed at the beautiful arts and crafts Rhiba creates.

“She is very artistic and puts a huge effort into everything she does. She finds it very rewarding and it helps her to relax.”

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest provider of care homes and supported living services, and recently received a ‘Gold’ Investors in People award.

Strathnairn


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Specialism: The service is able to support individuals with a learning disability and or mental health needs, people with sensory loss/impairment, people

New job for the new year at Wren Park


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Our Wren Park supported living service in Surrey is appealing to local people considering a new job for the New Year to think about opportunities in the care sector.

Sharon Meyers who leads the team at Wren Park, a large detached house which provides a home for up to 17 people with acquired brain injury, in self-contained flats shared by up to 6 individuals.

Sharon said: “There are tremendous career opportunities in the care sector for people who have the desire to really make a difference to the lives of others.

“No-one would describe what we do as ‘easy’ but it can be incredibly rewarding providing a stepping stone for individuals with ABI to return to a more independent life.

“Care offers interesting and challenging opportunities, and attracts people from a variety of backgrounds. The most important characteristic of a good carer is having genuine passion for what they do.”

Senior support worker Karon Belcher, who joined the team at Wren Park near Purley almost two years ago has worked in the care sector for 21 years and says that caring is the perfect job for her.

Karon said: “The people we work with have very complex needs, but supporting them to make progress in their journey towards a more independent life is incredibly satisfying.

“Our aim is to support individuals to achieve their goals, participate in meaningful activities and become more self-sufficient, building on their skills. We can continue with previously established rehabilitation goals and strategies or, where required, adjust these or develop new ones.”

“When potential new staff are interviewed and selected, the individuals at Wren Park are involved, which is what gives our team its ‘extended-family’ character.”

Applicants are guaranteed an interview, attended by two staff and at least one person we support, and all decisions reached regarding recruitment are mutually agreed by all.

The staff team that support Wren Park have over 50 years’ experience within the acquired brain injury rehabilitation setting, and has gathered the necessary skills and experience to help the people they support achieve their rehabilitation goals.

Many have completed specialist training in ABI, managing challenging behaviours, epilepsy and total communication training.

Sharon Meyers who leads the team was nominated by her employer in the 2015 Surrey Care Awards, citing as reasons her success in helping service users access the care packages they need, and the engaging programme of activities she runs such as outings to London Zoo and trips to the West End to see shows like The Lion King.

Wren Park is part of the Regard group, the UK’s fourth biggest provider of supported living and specialist residential services, who recently received a Gold Investors in People award.

To ensure that appointments to all positions are the right ones, Regard has developed a detailed criteria for each role and interview questions that probe applicants’ aptitude and attitude towards work in the health and social care sector.

Job induction includes two weeks of shadowing to build the confidence of new recruits, plus mandatory and service-specific training.

For further details on this role, please contact Sharon Meyers on 0208 668 2621 or via email at wrenpark@regard.co.uk

Wren Park


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Specialism: Adults with a traumatic or non-traumatic ABI and varying degrees of cognitive, physical, behavioural and emotional difficulties.

Details of Vacancy:

Christmas countdown at Faerdre in Llandysul


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An inspired idea by a senior support worker who cares for people with learning difficulties means they are making the most of the run-up to Christmas with a different festive activity for every day of the month.

Senior support worker Katie Owen was determined that every day in December would have its own bit of magic for the people she supports who live at Faerdre, a residential service in Llandysul, so she devised a special Christmas count-down programme.

Starting off with writing letters to Santa on the first day of the month, the programme includes Christmas-themed sing-songs, making tree decorations, seasonal baking, festive films, puzzles, making wreaths and trimmings, bingo, cards, quizzes, sports, dressing-up, a disco, carol-singing and a pub-outing.

Katie Owen said: “Everyone is really entering into the festive spirit and having a lovely time.

“The favourite activity so far has probably been making Christmas wreaths, and Faerdre is looking very beautiful, decked out with all the trimmings and cards that have been made by our service users.”

Faerdre is a large detached country house near Llandysul which accommodates eight adults with learning disabilities and mental health needs. The service also provides support to people who present with varying levels of behavioural needs.

Service users keep busy in the vegetable garden, producing potatoes, beans, peas and many other crops, as well as caring for Faerdre’s cat and dog, and enjoying the goats, sheep, donkeys, alpacas and wallaby at the next-door donkey sanctuary.

In 2015 the staff team at Faerdre was nominated for the National Learning Disability Awards, because of “the immense amount of kindness, patience and compassion they always display towards their service users, ensuring their needs and wishes are paramount in everything they do.”

The service supports adults who have complex needs and high levels of vulnerability, enabling them to become more independent in their everyday lives.

Bespoke support plans for each individual include them making an input to the day-to-day running of the house and planning their own activities. They play a full part in the wider community, with some of them involved in local work placements.

External activities in 2015 have included some of the service users and staff raising over £365 for charity by completing the 5K Ty Hafan Rainbow Run, a visit to Folly Farm, and a weekend break to Trecco Bay in Porthcawl, as well as them hosting their own pool party and garden barbecue.

Unusually there a currently two vacancies at the service, both first floor bedrooms, one of which has a small lounge area and attached bathroom. All service users have shared use of a spacious communal sitting room, a cosy quiet room, a separate dining room area and a large kitchen.

Faerdre is part of the Regard group, the UK’s fourth biggest provider of supported living and specialist residential services, who recently received a Gold Investors in People award.

Families or commissioners wishing to know more can talk to Katie Owen on 01559 362 577, or call Regard’s referrals hotline on 0800 840 0313.

Faerdre


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We are holding an event in June for Care Home Open Day 2017. Everyone is welcome, please contact us on the email below for

Pioneering scheme success in Strood’s Orchard View


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Our Orchard View residential care home near Strood is pioneering a new way of supporting people with autism and complex needs to live more independent lives.

For the past six months Orchard View has been piloting a specially-created database designed to identify individuals’ health, behaviour, personal care, skills teaching and development needs.

The ‘Personal Daily Outcomes’ model has been developed by care provider Regard from existing best-practice and is set to be rolled to the company’s 147 supported living and residential care services across the country.

John Henderson, service manager of the Frindsbury-based service, said: “The database is helping us to capture details of approaches that are likely to work with the individuals in our care.

“It means on a daily basis we can gather and cross-check information, record consistency or changes in an individual’s wants/needs and note any progress made. It also helps identify any regulatory and training needs.

“Information is easy to collate and analyse and means we can make any adaptations necessary when a person’s independence increases.”

The ‘Personal Daily Outcomes’ (PDO) model was recently shortlisted in the ‘Care Pathways’ category for the prestigious LaingBuisson Awards.

John says the database complements the work of support staff to support individuals to lead more independent lives.

“Now, no matter how complex a person’s disability, using Personal Daily Outcomes we are much better equipped to monitor the people who live with us and chart their progress towards greater independence.

“Being involved in the running of the house means learning new skills and improves people’s ability to concentrate as well as being good exercise. This gives people a sense of purpose and fulfilment and helps reduce anxiety levels.”

People living at Orchard View are involved in drawing up menus, grocery shopping, preparing and cooking the evening meal.

Individuals have their own bank account and pay a weekly visit to their local branch with a staff member. They also launder their own clothes and bedding.

Jody and Shaun are two of Orchard View’s success stories: they are celebrating after being moved up a class on their course at Mid Kent College.

The pair began a catering course in 2014 and how regularly come up with menus, shop and prepare food for their house-mates.

Regard is the UK’s fourth biggest private provider of supported living and specialist residential services in the UK for people with learning disabilities, mental health needs and Acquired Brain Injury.

Further details are available from www.regard.co.uk or call 0208 255 4433

Orchard View


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Specialism: Autism and complex behaviours.

Details of vacancy: There are currently no vacancies.

Type of Service: Residential predominantly male