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The people we support at Livingstone Road recently enjoyed a fun, interactive ‘animal experience’, with visits from a range of animals including a chinchilla, snake, meerkat, hedgehog and chameleon. The animals came from Animal World – an organisation who rescue animals, give them better living conditions, and take them on visits to educate others about the animal world.

A friendly ferret, tortoise, gecko, rabbit, and bearded dragons also came along.

The person who leads the Livingstone Road team said “As soon as the pet carriers were brought in, Jason excitedly jumped up from the sofa, peered into the crates, asking what was in them.

“All staff and the people we support were able to handle and stroke the animals. We were given blankets so that the pets felt safe, and also to protect us from any stray animal mess.”

“Glen got to walk the ferret around the living room, but it then tried to escape under the sofa, to see if there were any stray nibbles. Then the chameleon climbed onto Glen’s chest, and on top of the heads of staff and service manager! Paul enjoyed doing a lovely drawing of the chinchilla.”

The people we support enjoyed the experience immensely. Glen said “I liked them - especially the snake! I also got to feed the skinny pig! They were all good - but not the meerkat”.

Jason said, “I liked them all so much - they were all lovely!”

The person who leads the Livingstone Road team concluded: “The experience was really enjoyable for both the people we support, and the staff team. All our individuals had huge smiles on their faces when they were able to handle and see the animals - some of which can only be found in zoos! It was a genuinely heartwarming experience to see everyone involved in the activity, thoroughly enjoying themselves. Pet therapy is invaluable, and this visit was a testament to this.“

Acquired Brain Injury Service - Livingstone Road


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Specialism: Supported Living Service in Gillingham, Kent supporting adults with a traumatic or non-traumatic Acquired Brain Injury and varying degrees of cognitive, physical, behavioural and